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Full text of "Minutes of the Kehukee Baptist Association [serial]"

MINUTES 

PJI OF THE t ■ 

■Kehukee Baptist Association, 

EP^'i^Pw'- ' i^OLDlEN AT 

Sketvarhey Meeting-House « 

MARTIN COUNTY, 

Commencing Saturday before the first LoraVs-Day in Qc~ 
, 1826. 



Saturday, Sept. 30, 182r. 
$, The Introductory Sermon was delivered pursuant to appoint- 
ment, by Eider Philemon Bennett, from Acts xx. chap. &, 
28th verse; "Take heed, therefore, unto yourselves, and to all 
the flock over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you over- 
seers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with 
his own blood." Prayer by Elder Ameriah Biggs. 

2. The Association then convened; and being opened with pray- 
er, by Elder Philemon Bennett; proceeded to choose Elder 
Philemon Bennett, Moderator; Elder Joseph Biggs, Clerk; 
who called to his assistance, Brother Joseph D. Biggs. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, (present,) from sister Associations 
(who are not messengers to this,) were invited to take seats 
wilh us; whereupon Brother Jlmos Rayner^ seated himself. 

4. Letters from twenty-eight churches were read, and the dele- 
gates took their seats; took the following account of the church- 
es, as stated in the table of churches. 

A Petitionary letter from a church lately constituted on Little 
Alligator, in Tyrrell County; (for admittance in this x\ssocia~ 
tion,) was handed in by their messenger, Joshua Evans; the 
same was read, and on enquiry found they were constituted on 
the principles which we thought orthodox, and they were re- 
ceived as a member of this Association, by the Moderator giv- 
ing the right hand of fellowship to their delegate. 
8. Also, another Petitionary letter, from the church at Blunt's 
Creek, Beaufort County; (which was formerly a member of the 
Neuse Association, and dismissed from them to become a mem- 
ber of this,) was handed in by their delegates, Thomas Roba- 
son, and Joseph Tripp; the same was read, and they were re 
eeive,4 as a member of this Association. 





















=0 


CHURCHES. 


MINISTERS & DELEGATES. 


tized. 






fa 

Co 


<i... 


R 


Fund 






% 


. c 










f j3 


. 

W C. 


1 L.ono/io, — — 


John Bryan, James Mayo, 
JamesThigpen,SolomoriLawrence, 




2! 1 


4 




i 


■ — 

60 


1 00 


jc, K^ontioe , — — •= 


1 




1 




1 




13 


1 00 


3 Concord f - - 


iVllv^AJArl AiVlDKUHib, Joshua 












I ' 










1 





r 


2 




7C 


1 50 


4 L.roSS-JtvOadS, - 


WM. nViviAIN, Joseph J.rippen, 


o 
Z 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


48 


1 00 


o ueep, x^reejc,— - 


Thomas Godwin, Jesse Powell,* 






1 








61 


1 00 


6 Falls Far River— 


joei cattle,* James o. battle, - 


1 




1 




3 




'9 b 


3 00 


7 Fishing Creek , 


UDTT T7 A/T C\ XT U XT XT XT TJ T"T"" 

r rilLjXL.l\lL)JN BllilN JN sit 1 1, Wil- 




















2 






3 


1 


2 




71 


1 50 


o Jr tut OWaT/ip., — 


Wm. W^. K. Philfiot, James Brown, 


Q 




fi 









59 


1 00 


9 Frying 1 Fan, — 


John Richardson, - - - - - 


<-> 








4 


2 


26 


1 00 


3.0 Goose Creek } - 


71 T.' r? KX t % A T> O C\\\T A XT T r , ™ «o 
LxK rLiJli IN L-AKKUVVAiN, James 

. Potter, - -- -- -- - 












1 


35 


1 50 


11 Great Swamji, — 


Richard Baldrie, J. S. Brown, - 


22 


1 


1 
I 


3 


1 


1 


114 


1 75 


32 Head o J Pungo— 


John l^larK,* John K. JJavis,* - 




1 






1 




16 


50 


13 Kehukce,—*™ 


General Young, Thomas Brewer, 


9 
.o 






2 


3 




1 14 


1 00 


St J^ill U/rC7ltt o 1VJ..JC1. 


TrmTTTTA T AWRFMPF Avthnr 
JUotlU r\ 1j/\.,VV xxlliiM v_ iLi, /I T Lil Ul 




1 

1 












oy 


1 50 




ivjiurK ri. jjennezv, jonn in. uraKe, 


r> 
O 


2 










C Q 
O Z 


1 00 


16 Morattocky 


AMILKlArl 151ijrVjb, JLangleyKis- 






















1 
i 




O 




2 


3 


101 


2 00 


jv iviapie ojirmgfj 




















18 JVbrM Crefk, - 


l^liiMU Jiili KUSS, 1 hos. 15arrow, 


/I 


1 








4 


32 


1 25 


-iy jreacn i ree,j - 


X. ''.' S ";v ' ' ' ~':..i ' : ' : ; C : T <• , " • : \ ^ 














53 




isv \/?ia?iK.ey,i - 
















12 




2\ i\€u J^ua, — — - 


1 homas btokes, John Pierce, 


n 
O 




1 
1 


1 


2 




36 


1 00 




















.O'er* m /i 4* 
















00 




24 &mfl?y Creek, f 




















25 Scufifiernong, — 


Joshua Sprewell, Joseph Harriss, 


3 




* 








38 


50 


26 Safioney,\ - 
















38 




27 Skewarkcy, 

28 Smithmick's Cr. 


JUcsliilrri BlLrVjb, John vVara, 


21 


7 


9 


1 


1 


1 


141 


2 35 


HUbHiA l.iAJNlii.K, Joshua Koba- 


















jy oo. iviattamus- 


^ * 














46 


1 00 


]^eet, — 


Jonathan Jarvis, Rich. M.G.Moore, 


1 












29 


2 00 


SO S firing Green , 


JUrliN J. lLiii, Jjeweiung nowers, 


7\ 






1 


4 




57 


75 


31 Sound Side, — « 


Zebulon Keinp,Wm. J.Livermore,* 


t 


4 


16 


1 






56 


1 00 


32 Farborough, — 


Joseph Pippen,* Zachariah Griffin, 




3 


1 


1 






32 


1 2: 


,jj i ranter s L.reeK, 


JEREMIAH LEGGETT, Wil- 




















liam Clark, - - 


11 


3 


2 








40 


1 yJyJ 


34 Washington, — 

35 Williams* M. H— 


Miles Everitt, John B. Archibald, 
Stephen Bradley, James Eleanor, 
Thomas Robason, Joseph Tripp, 


11 


1 


1 


1 


2 




67 


1 50 






1 


1 


3 




68 


1 00 


"\f> Fil lint's CvppV 


22 


2 


1 




p 







1 00 


37 Little Alligator— 
















20 


1 00 




Total, 140 


35 


61 


2 7 


<*8 


14 


1900 


37 85 



N. B. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in CAPITALS; 
unordained Ministers in Italics; those marked thus, * were not present; from 
Churches marked thus, f we received no intelligence, in that case their number- 
stands as last year; dashes — denote no Pastors; the last column shews the sums 
contributed by the Churches to the Association fund. 



u. A Letter of correspondence, from the Neuse Association, 
handed in by their messenger, Elder Irvin Moye, the same 
was read, and the messenger seated himself with us, who pre- 
sented us with sundry copies of their Minutes. 
Also, Minutes of the Chowan Association was handed us. by 
FJders James Ross, and William H. Jordan, (their letters 
failing to come to hand,) who were messengers from said As- 
sociation, and they seated themselves with us. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz.) Elders Joseph 
Biggs, Joshua Lawrence, William H. Jordan, and Wil- 
liam Hyman, to examine the Circular Letter, (if one should 
come to hand,) if not, to select something in lieu thereof. 
Brethren James Mayo, and James S. Battle, on finance. 
Elder Joshua Lawrence, to prepare a letter of correspondence 
to the Neuse Association. — Elder William Hyman, to prepare 
one to the Chowan Association. The above committees to re- 
port on Monday next. 

8. Elder Joshua Lawrence is requested to prepare a Circular 
Letter, and present to our next Association. 

9. Resolved, that our next Association be holden at Kehukee Meet- 
ing-House, Halifax County, to commence on Saturday, before 
the first LordVday in October, 1827. — Divine service to com- 
mence at 11 o'clock, A. M.— Elder Joseph Biggs, is request- 
ed to deliver an Introductory Sermon to that Association; and 
in case of his failure, Elder Green Carrowan is requested to 
do the same. 

10. Elders Green Carrowan, William H. Jordan, and Joshua 
Lawrence, (b} 7 private ballot.) are requested to occupy the 
stage, by preaching, on the morrow, and that divine service 
commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned, with prayer by Elder 
Wm. H. Jordan, until Monday morning next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

Lords-day, October 1, 1826. 
The Elders, that were requested to occupy the stage to-day, met 
a large assemblage of people, and proceeded in the following 
manner, (viz.) Eider Green Carrowan introduced the service 
of the day, and preached from Joshua vi. chap. & latter clause 
of the 20th verse, "And they took the city." Elder Wm. H. 
Jordan followed, and preached from 1st Corinthians, iii. chap. 
22 & 23 verses; "Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the 
world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come, 
all are yours; and ye are Christ's, and Christ is God's." Elder 
Joshua Lawrence followed, and closed, from St. Mark, xvi. 
chap. 15 & 16 verses; "And he said unto them, go ye into all 
the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. He that 
believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth 
not shall be damned." — Prayer by Elder James Ross. — From 
the apparent zeal of the ministers in preaching, and the attention 
of the congregation, we hope a blessing will follow the labours 
of this day. 



Monday Morning, October 2, 1826. 
The Association being convened, was opened with prayer? 
by Elder James Ross; and proceeded to business. 

11. The following committees made their reports, (viz.) the com- 
mittee appointed to write to the Neuse Association, reported 
that there was no letter prepared, and said committee is reques- 
ted to prepare one, under the signature of the Moderator and 
Clerk; and Elders Joshua Lawrence, John Tice, and Broth- 
er Mark H. Bennett were appointed messengers, to bear the 
same. — The committee appointed to write to the Chowan 
Association, reported, as above, and are requested as above, to 
prepare one, as above directed; and Eiders Philemon Ben- 
nett, Joseph Bjggs, William Hyman, and Joshua Law- 
rence, are appointed messengers to bear the same. 

The committee appointed to examine the Circular Letter, re- 
ported, that no such letter had come to hand; neither had they 
^elected any thing in lieu thereof; therefore recommend to this 
Association, that the person that may be appointed to prepare 
these Minutes for the press, be requested to endeavour to collect 
a biography, (if possible,) of the life and death of Elder Wil- 
liam Lancaster, and attach to these Minutes, in lieu of a 
Circular Letter. — The committee of finance reported that they 
found there was, in the hands of the Treasurer of this Associ- 
ation, at the close of last Association the sum of $22 621 
That they had received in contributions from the 

Churches at this Association, - - 38 05 

Making the sum of $60 67§ 
Paid Elder Joseph Biggs, for transcribing the Minutes of 
1825, for the press, superintending the printing, record- 
ing one copy on our records, and distributing the Minutes 
to the several Churches and sister Associations, $10 00 
Paying the Printer, for printing 500 copies, 20 00 

Expenditure* $30 00 
Leaving a balance now in the hands of Treasurer of $30 67;! 
The Association concurred with the report. 

12. A paper purporting to be a declaration of the Reformed Baptist 
Churches in North Carolina, (that was read on Saturday last, 
and ordered to remain on the table until this day,) was called 
up and again read.— The same was referred to the Churches, 
severally, composing this Association; for them to report on, 
to the next Association, their sentiments of the several articles 
therein stated. 

] 3. Elder Joseph Biggs, is requested to tr .scribe these Minutes for 
the press, have 500 copies printed, r.nd distribute them as usual. 

The Association then adjourned, to the time and place ap- 
pointed, with an address by the Moderator, and prayer by 
Elder William H. Jordan. 

PHILEMON BENNETT, Moderator . 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. ' 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

JKehukee Baptist Association^ 

HOLDEN AT 

HALIFAX COUNTY, 

Qemmencing Saturday before the first Lord's- Day in Octo- 
ber, 1827, 



Saturday, October 6, 1827. 
li The Introductory Sermon was delivered, by Eldei Philemon Beu 
nett, from Psalms, cvii. and 7th verse: "And he led them forth by the 
right way, that they might go to a city of habitation." 

2. The Association then convened, and being opened with prayer, by 
Elder Philemon Bennett, proceeded to choose Elder Philemon Ben- 
nett, Moderator; Brother William Clark, Clerk; who called to his as- 
sistance Brother Joseph D. Biggs. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, (present,) from sister Associations, (who 
are not messengers to this,) were invited to seats with us; whereupon El- 
der William B. Worrell, and brethren Mark H. Bennett, and James X; 
Warren, seated themselves. 

4. Letters from thirty-five churches, were read, and the delegates tools 
their seats: 4ook the following account of the churches^ as stated in th§> 
<able of churches. 




1 Blunts Creek, — 

2 Conoho,— - - 

'3 Conetoe, 

4 Concord, - - 
•5 Cross- Roads, - 

6 Deep- Creek, — 

7 FallsTar -River,-* 

8 Fishing Creek, 

9 .F/a* Swamp, - 

30 Frying- Pan, — 
11 Goose Creek, - 

*12 Great Swamp., — 

13 Kehukee,— 

14 Lawrence's M.Hi 

15 Little Alligator, — 

16 Mearn's Chapel, — 

17 Maple Spring,] 
38 Morattock,— 
19 .A/br*A Creek, - 

•20 PeacA Tree,— 

21 Picot M. H.— 

22 Pungo,— 

23 Quankey, — - 

24 i?ed Bud,— - 

25 i?eecfy Creek, — 

26 .Rocky Swampy 

27 Sandy Creek, — 

28 Scuppernong, — 

29 Saponey, - - 

tJO Skewarkey, 

31 Smithwick's Cr.— 
■32 S.Mattamuskeet— 
33 Spring Green, 
'34 Sound Side, — 

35 Tarboro', — 

36 Tranter's Creek, 

37 Washington, — 
>38 Williams' M.H.— 



Peter Doughty,* Rob't Tripp, 
John Bryan, Jas. Mayo, 
James Thigpen, James Jones, 
MICAJAH AMBROSE, 
WM. HYMAN, VVm. R. Long, 
Allen Whitehead,* Thos. Shields. 
Jos. S. Battle, Jas S. Battle, 
PHILEMON BENNETT, Jno. 
Suite, 

LUKE WARD, Edm. Andrews, 24 
John Richardson,* - 5 
GREEN CARROWAN, Robert 

Silverthorn, - - | 

Willis Fiemmg, J. S. Brown, 5 
General Young, Thos. Brewer, 3 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, William] 

Dicken, - - j 
Joseph Evans, - - ' 

Willie Buntyn,* Nath'l Harrisscn, 

Charles Blount, Langley Respass, ' 7 
LEMUEL ROSS,* John Satch- 

well, Samuel Vines,* - 18 
Gideon Bass, Geo. Boddie,* - 2 
J.G. Smithwick, Joshua Robason,* 
Sam'l Clark, Jno. R. Davis; - 
Wm. Cullum, Stephen Pepper,* 
Robt. Gupton,* Jno. Brasswell,* 3 

5 



Joseph Harriss,* Rob't Bertie,* 
JORDAN SHERROD,* Sherrod 

Williams, - 
JOSEPH BIGGS,* Thos. Biggs, 

John Ward, 
HOSEA LANIER, John Perry, 
Henry Carrow, Wm. Boomer, 
JOHN TICE, Jesse Coburn, 
Zebulon Kemp, Caleb Woodard, 
P. P. Lawrence,* Enos Green, 
JEREMIAH LEGGITT,* Wm. 

Clark, 4 
Jno. B. Archibald, A'n Windley,*, 8 
Jas. Eleanor, Stephen Bradley, 



i 




16 


1 


3^ 


2 


1 


1 


1 



Total, 11911 



14 5 

i ! i 
i 

l! 2' 1 

1 3j 2 

! 2 
1 i 
1 



17 



2| 1 

1 
1 



1 

3 

105 



30 



79 1 50 
75 1 00 
1 31 75 



2 33 1 00 

3 98 1 50 

2 1 122 1 00 

, j j 

2 
1 



114 
1 



1 

5 

1 4 
1 

3 



4925 



1951!38 00 



N. B. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CAPI- 
TALS; unordained Ministers in Italics; those marked thus, * were not present; from. 
Churches marked thus, f we received no intelligence, in that case their number 

stands as last year; dashes denote no Pastors; the last column shews the amount 

contributed by the Churches to the Association fund, 




HBP' g* & ■ 3fc • « 

5. A petitionary letter from a church lately constituted at the Pico£ 
Meeting- House, Martin county, (for admittance in this Association,) waft 
handed in and read, and upon examination, found them orthodox; and they 
were received, by the Moderator, giving their messenger the right hand, 
of fellowship, as a member of this Association. 

6. Letters of correspondence, from sister Associations, were called for$, 
when one from the Neuse Association was handed in by their messenger. 
Elder Benjamin Bynum, accompanied with sundry copies of their last 
Minutes, and the letter was read, and the delegate seated himself with us. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Elders Philemojs 
Bennett, Luke Ward, Green Carrowan, and William B. Worrell to 
examine the Circular Letter. Brethren James Mayo, and James S. Battle, 
on finance. Elder William Hyman to prepare a letter of correspon- 
dence, to the Neuse Association. Elder Joshua Lawrence, to prepare 
another to the Chowan Association. The above committees to report oa 
Monday next. 

8. Brother William Clark, to prepare a Circular Letter, (on any reli- 
gious subject he may think proper,) and present the same to our next As- 
sociation. 

9. Resolved, that our next Association, beholden at North-Creek Meet-, 
ing-house, Beaufort county, to commence on Saturday before the first 
Lord's-Day in October, 1828: Elder Joshua Lawrence, is requested to 
deliver an Introductory Sermon to that Association, and in case of his fail- 
ure, Elder William Hyman is requested to do the same. Divine ser«* 
vice to commence at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

10. Elders Joshua Lawrence, William Hyman, and Green Carro- 
wan, are requested to occupy the stage by preaching on the morrow, di- 
vine service to commence, at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned, with prayer, by Brother WilliaMi 
Cjarfc, until Monday morning next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

Lord's-Day, October 7th, 1827. 
Elder Green Carrowan, opened the service of the day, and preached- 
irom John iii. chap, and 8th verse: "The wind bloweth where it listeth, 
and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, 
and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the spirit. 99 Elder 
William Hyman followed, and preached from James i. chap, and 27th. 
verse: "Pure religion and Undefiled before God and the Father is this, to 
visit the fatherless and widows ill their affliction, and to keep himself un- 
spotted from the world." Elder Joshua Lawrence followed, and clo- 
sed, from Exodus xiv. chap, and 15th verse: "And the Lord said unto 
Moses, wherefore criest thou. unto me? Speak unto the children of Israel, 
that they go forward." Prayer, by Elder Philemon Bennett. From, 
the zeal of the ministers in preaching, and the good attention of the con- 
gregation, we hope a divine blessing will follow the labors of this day. 

Monday Morning, Oct. 8, 1827. 
The Association being convened, was opened with prayer, by EJdqr 
WtLHAM Hyman, and proceeded to business, 



4= 

11. The committee appointed to prepare a letter of correspondence to 
the Neuse Association, handed in one which was read and approved of, 
and Elders William Hyman, John Tice, and Joshua Lawrence, are 
appointed our messengers to bear the same. The committee appointed to 
Write to the Chowan Association, handed in a letter, which was read and 
approved, and Elders Luke Ward, Hosea Lanier, and Brother tVilliam 
Clark, appointed our messengers to bear the same. 

The committee appointed to examine the Circular Letter, reported, that 
they had received one, but not having time to correct, or add thereto, had 
handed it back to the writer, for amendment; and when by him done, to- 
be inspected by Elders Philemon Bennett, and William Hyman, and 
then to be forwarded to the Editor of these Minutes in time to be annexed 
thereto* The committee on finance reported, that they found there was 
in the hands of the Treasurer at the close of last Association, $30 67| 
Paid Elder Joseph Biggs, for transcribing the Minutes of 1826, 
preparing them for the press, superintending the printing, re- 
cording one copy in the Association Book, and distributing the 
Minutes to the several churches, and sister Associations as 
usual, - $10 00 

JPaying the Printer for printing 500 copies, \~ > S 00 

18 00 

Leaving a balance of - - - - . $12 67$ 

Received in contributions from the churches at this Association, 38 00 



Making a balance now in the hands of the Treasurer of $50 67$ 
The Association concurred with the above report. 

12. Resolved, that the Editor of these Minutes, be requested to furnish 
the Chowan and Neuse Associations, with 30 copies each of these Minutes* 

13. Resolved, that it be requested of the churches, composing this As- 
sociation, that on the first LordVDay of each church's monthly meeting, 
after the rise of this Association, be severally by them observed as a day of 
thanksgiving to Almighty God, for his wonderful displays of divine grace 
at this Association; and the love that appears still to exist among the breth- 
ren, and churches that compose the same. 

14. Resolved, that whereas a paper purporting to be a declaration of the 
Reformed Baptist Churches in North-Carolina, dated 26th August, 1826, 
Yvhich was Handed into our last Association, and read, (containing several 
articles,) and the said Association, referred the same, to the churches com- 
posing this body, which were requested to give their sentiments severally 
on said articles to this Association; which being done by most of the 
churches, at this time — after an interchange of opinions by the members of 
this body, it was agreed that as to Missionary Societies, Tract Societies, 
Bible Societies, a^pd Theological Seminaries, that we discountenance them, 
and the practices heretofore resorted to for their support, in begging mo- 
ney from the public to back them: and that if any person should come, or 
be amongst us, as agents of any of the above societies, we discountenance 
them in the practice abovesaid: and further, should they be under the cha- 
racter of ministers of the Gospel, that we will not invite them into our pul- 
pits, knowing them to bo sucjh: believing these society and institutions^ 



* • 

to be the inventions of men, and are not warranted from the word of GocL 
As to the article in said paper, relative to Masonry, we unanimously agree, 
that should any of the members of our churches, join said fraternity, or be 
members thereof, and continue to visit their lodges, and Masonic parades, 
that it shall be a bar. to prevent them from fellowship with us in our seve- 
ral churches; and should any Baptist minister, join said fraternity, or be- 
long thereto, and continue to associate therewith, in the lodges, or Masonic 
parades, that in such case, we will not invite them to preach in our pulpits; 
believing them to be guilty of such practices; and we hereby declare a non- 
fellowship with such practices altogether. 

15. Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs, be requested to transcribe these 
Minutes, and prepare them for the press, superintend the printing, and dis- 
tribution thereof, to the several churches, and sister Associations, with 
which we correspond; and have 600 copies printed. 

The Association then adjourned, to the time and place appointed, with 
an address, and prayer by the Moderator. 

PHILEMON BENNETT, Moderator. 
WILLIAM CLARK, Clerk. 



Circular* 

'fflie Kehukee Association now sitting at Kehukee Meeting-house, Hali- 
fax county, the 6th, 1th, and Sth October — to the several Churches 
they represent — send greeting t 

Dearly beloved Brethren: having under a kind and auspicious provi- 
dence, been permitted to convene in our annual meeting, you will no 
doubt expect as heretofore, an epistle from us on some subject of impor- 
tance, for your instruction and comfort while passing through this vale of 
tears here below; and we know of nothing that may give you the alike 
joy, as to hear from our meeting in terminating as it did; being so over- 
ruled by an almighty and merciful God, surpassing any thing we had con- 
ceived, or ever expected, from the general excitement and contention that 
had long raged producing discord and distress in our body of churches: we 
think it will be joy to you, as well as a duty we owe our God, of infinite 
goodness and love to record in memory; and shew to future generations, 
the great care of God over his people, in this hour of division, danger and 
distress: When ready to sink in the deep waters of disunion and strife, 
and be overwhelmed with party spirit, and bad feelings; that this almighty, 
kind, and merciful God, who has promised to be the guide of his people, 
even unto death, should have manifested, that his everlasting arms were un- 
derneath us, and shew to all around that the gates of hell should not pre- 
vail against his churches; which is to us as great astonishment, and as joy- 
fully affording deliverance, as Israel experienced at the Red Sea, or as * 
when the Jews brought back the fleeing, mourning king David to his 
house, and destroyed party spiritj that he should step in like the days of 



6 

JSsther, and save Lis falling, and ready to sink churches, when there was. 
not scarce a hair's, breadth, between them and division; it is surprising 
grace, and it was the Lord's doing, and is marvellous in our eyes. The 
tho'ts of which divine watch care, manifested in this hour of danger, pro- 
duced feelings of joy and love, unspeakable and unutterable; every heart 
having at this time, more joy, union, love and peace, than it could express, 
for fullness, and wiping of tears; that we indeed from experiencing the 
quick and unexpected transition, from the feeling of party spirit, to a union 
of hearts could exclaim with the Psalmist: "Behold how good, and how 
pleasant it is, for brethren to dwell together in unity," in accents of joy to 
overflowing; and feeling unwilling that you should not rejoice with us, and 
he participants of that happiness, resulting from the gracious kindness of 
our God, manifested to this Association, when every heart trembled with 
fear and pain, for the state of the churches. 

We shall therefore give you, beloved brethren, a brief sketch of the cir- 
cumstances, attending our meeting. On Saturday the 6th, we met; but O 
God, who can describe the feelings of God's dear people? both ministers 
and private members; the coldness J of affection, the shyness, the fear of di- 
vision, the painful party spirit, that raged in every bosom more or less; the 
grief, the contentions in little groups of brethren, arguing to prove, and 
disprove, who was right; and the general excitement by saint and sinner, 
to see and hear, what the end would be; yet we had remaining love, and 
good will enough, to proceed to preach, and hear the Introductory Ser- 
mon, which was ably delivered; and then prepared for business as usual; 
when it was proposed, that on reading the letters, no notice should be ta- 
fcen of the answer of the churches, to the articles which was referred to 
them last year, (purporting to be a declaration of the Reformed Baptist 
Churches in North-Carolina,) or that it should be referred to the churches 
another year, which was objected to, and then put to vote; and decided by 
a large majority to receive the answer of the churches, in their letters as 
they were read; and the subject to lay over for debate, until Monday next, 
with these remarks: Who can tell what God may do for us? or, if we must 
part, we would part in peace, and without reproaching one another. It 
was found in the answers of the letters, that there were twenty churches 
unanimous, in favor of the declaration; some other churches in favor of all 
but the word reform; and some divided: But all the churches, but one, 
were opposed to a Baptist joining the Masonic Society, and visiting the 
lodges, and parades. 

From the brethren's being together on Saturda}^, and Sunday, and con- 
versing, and preaching, and hearing preaching, we hope God, so temper- 
ed their hearts, as to have a heart of prayer, and a sincere wish for his di- 
rection; and to be so disposed, as to bring about peace, union and love, 
once more among them. For on Monday, when we came together, it 
seemed to be the prayer of all hearts, to put an end to strife and contention, 
that had so long destroyed the harmony of Ministers and Christians on 
these subjects; and after going through the balance of the business of the „ 
Association, we then on Monday took up the declaration: at first view it 
seemed impossible that ministers, and brethren, so opposite in their opin- 
ions, could ever have come together in oneness, of acknowledged sent!- 
merit; and we are forced to say from our view of the case, ttrat had we all 



\ , .. : \ '.-f" ' .. '? . . 1 \.. .. 

sirare to the utmost ©f ©ur power, and have had to our assistance^ all the 
ministers in the state, it could not have been effected, by human agency. 
Bui 0, wonderful to relate, and everlasting thanks to God, our father, and 
Jesus Christ, the head of his church, and the Holy Spirit, by whose pow- 
erful influence, we hope our peace was restored. After some debate, and 
explanations of our prepossessions, and imbibed opinions, concerning t he- 
articles of the aforesaid declaration, and other things; God broke in upon 
one souls with light, and oneness of sentiment, which followed with honesty v 
and humble confession, with tears, of all our hard censures, and reproach- 
ful speeches, of one another, each heart was broken to tenderness, and a 
full and free forgiveness followed, in the broken accents of general weep- 
ing; on all hands confession and forgiveness flowed, as free as water down 
a descent, from bosom to bosom; the holy flame of brotherly love enkin- 
dled all around, with more than speakable peace, joy and union, manifest- 
ing itself by flowing tears, eager shaking hands, holy kisses, and anxious 
embracing in each other's arms, with loud praises and thanks to Almighty 
God, with humble acknowledgments; this is of God, this is of God; and 
indeed we felt, and enjoyed, that spirit of forgiveness, joy, peace, union, 
and love, with and toward one another; and in such a high degree,,, that 
every doubt was removed, and each had a witness in his own heart, from 
what he felt that it was of God, to the mutual good of all; then our hearts 
overflowed, and the demons discord and party spirit, fled from every bo- 
som; we can attest that we have never witnessed the like, in any Chris- 
tian council heretofore; the Lord has^done, brethren, great things for us, 
whereof we are truly glad to our hearts; and wish you to join with us, to 
be ever thankful to his name; we think no man, saint nor sinner, could 
have witnessed all this scene, but must have acknowledged that, God was 
with us of a truth. And whatever may be said of these things; the divi- 
sion and strife that they have caused in our churches, and among ministers, 
is to us an evidence, they were never of God; and the re-union, love, joy, 
peace, and harmony, that abounded on all hands by ministers, saints, and 
sinners, at taking a decided stand against them, still shews God's interpo- 
sition to save his sinking and distracted churches, plainer than ever, that , 
they were not of God; for he is not the author of confusion, but of peace; 
as in all the churches of the saints; and surely, whatever breaks the union, 
peace and fellowship, of God's people, should be abstained from, by any, 
or every christian; because his, as well as his brother's happiness, is afc 
stake; as well as the general good of the society, of which he is a member. 
After coming to mutual fellowship, and brotherly love, every countenance 
seemed to wear a new aspect; every heart seemed to be tenderness, every 
voice seemed to be accents of love and acquiescence, to union, friendship, 
and peace; while silence reigned for a few minutes, to wipe away the flow- 
ing tears, interrupted here and there with hearts bursting forth the joys it 
was no longer able to contain, seemed to say to all around, the Lord is with 
his people to-day, indeed and in truth: Let the heaven's rejoice, and the 
Kehukee Association be glad, that the Lord has to her restored peace once 
more, and peace be to all the churches. The article reform was agreed to 
be left out, the five next was put to vote, and carried, by scarce a dissents 
ing voice, in their substance; the seventh article on Masonry, was carried 
by the voice of tlie churches, in their letters j and so praised Godj for his,, 



s 

^Tindness towards us; and parted with more brotherly love, than we have 
since the days of modern missions; and so let brotherly love continue, is 
our prayer for Christ, and our peace sake. 

And now, dear brethren, we beseech you, by the mercies of God, the 
honor and progression of his cause, and the peace of all our churches, that 
with ail meekness and lowliness of mind, you endeavor to keep the unity 
of the spirit, hereafter in the bonds of peace, by walking godly, and righ- 
teously in this present world, £fnd forgiving and forgettiug all the past; 
burying, (in the decision of the Association all former animosities,) and 
take heed not to disturb the hatchet nor the helve; and at all times have a 
single eye to the glory of God, and your brethren's feelings; for the Sa- 
viour has said, take heed how you offend one of these little ones, for their 
angels do always behold the face of their father; and Paul saith, when you 
sin so against the brethren, and wound their weak consciences, you sin 
against Christ; then be at all times careful, not to hurt the feelings of the 
weakest saint, and rather than do it, even deny yourselves things, which 
otherwise might be lawful; for vengeance is mine saith God, and I will re- 
pay it; and let this be your motto, the glory of God, the good of your bro- 
ther, and the peace of the society, of which you are a member; and dear 
brethren forgive, that you may be forgiven; cultivate love and friendship; 
be courteous, kind and hospitable; let your light shine in all good works,, 
that you may glorify your Father, which is in heaven, and bring honor on 
that religion you profess, and be a bright shining example to your family, 
and neighbors that sit in darkness, that they may take knowledge that you 
have been with Jesus; and enjoy peace in your own bosom, by walking 
uprightly before God. 

Now unto Him that is able to keep you from falling, and make you per- 
fect in every good work; be thanks and praise given, through all our 
churches, and throughout the world, for the great favor bestowed on us«. 
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, be with you, AMEN. 



Free Press — Tarborough, N. C. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist dissociation ■> 

HOLDEX AT 

BEAUFORT COUNTY, 

Saturday before the first Sunday in October, 1828. 



SATURDAY, October 4th, 1828. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Elder William Hymaj^ 
agreeable to appointment, (in case of failure,) from 2d Cor. 5th chap. 20th 
verse: "Now then we are ambassadors for Christ; as though God did be- 
seech you by us, we pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God." 
Prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

2. Afterwards assembled in an associated capacity, when Elder Green 1 
Carrowan opened the Association by prayer. Elder William Hyman 
was chosen Moderator, Elder Joseph Biggs Clerk, who called to his as- 
sistance Elder William Clark. 

3. The brethren in the Ministry, (not delegates from sister Associa- 
tions,) were invited to seats with us; when brethren Rayner and Whit- 
ford seated themselves with us — Raynortvom the Chowan, and Whitford 
from the Neuse Association. 

\ 4. Letters from twenty-two Churches were read, the Messengers names 
i enrolled, took the following account from the Churches, as stated in tb$ 
; table of Churches^ 



2 



CHURCHES. 



1 Blount's Creek 

2 Conoho, — 

3 Conetoe,— 

4 Concord,] - - 

5 Cross-Roads, - 

6 Deep Creek ;]— 

7 Falls Tar River,]- 

8 Fishing' Creek,] 

9 i^/a^ Swamfi, - 

10 Frying Pan,] — 

11 Goose Creek, - 

12 Great Swamfi, — 

13 Kehukee,— 

14 Lawrence's M. H. 

15 Little Alligator, — 

16 Mearn'sChafiel,]- 

17 Ma file Sfiring,]— 
43 Morattock, 

19 North Creek, - 

20 Peach Tree,]— 

21 Picot M. H, — 

22 Pungo, 

23 Quankey,]— - 

24 Red Bud,]— -. 

25 i^d-cty Creek,]— 

26 Rocky Swamfi,] - 

27 Sandy Creek,]— 

28 Scufifiernong, — 

29 Safioney,] - - 

30 Skewarkey, 

31 Smithwick's Cr.— 

32 Mattamuskeet, — 

33 Sfiring Green, — 

34 Sound Side, 

35 Tarboro',]— - 

36 Tranter's Creek, 

37 Washington, — 

38 Williams' M. H.]- 

39 Grindle Creek, 

40 Old Ford, — - 

41 White Plains, - 



MINISTERS & DELEGATES. ~ 



I 



Lotewick Reddict,Tea'e Doughty, 
John Bryan, James Mayo, 
Wm. Thigpen, James Thigpen, 

WM. HYMAN, Wm. Long, 



Edmond Andrews, Wm. Clements, 6 



GREEN CARROWAN, James 
Potter, | 
Jesse Moor, John S. Brown, 
John Stamper, Turner Brewer,* j 
James Biggs, Arthur Parker, 
Joseph Evans, James Swain,* 



Enoch Brickhouse, Charles Blount, 
Huel Abie, Jacob Wilkerson, 12 

Joseph Robason, Jno. G. Smith wick, % 
Thomas Gurganiss, J. R. Davis, 3 



Joseph Harris, Robert Bertie, 



JOSEPH BIGGS, Thos. Biggs, n 
Micajah Perry, Jesse Stallings, 
Josiah Harriss, James M'Gown, 27 
William Gray, j 
Gilbert Brickhouse,Isaac Mekins,*, 1 



Arnet Latham, Levin Wallace, 

Benj. F.Ebon, R. F. Lanier, 
Wm. Singleton, James Hodges, 
MILES EVERITT, Asa Oden, 



3$ =v£ 



13; 1' 

li 



2, 9 

] 3 

1 

I 1 

3 6 



Jeremiah Leggitt,* J. L. Warren, 24. 5 



2 1 



2 2 



1 6 1 



3 1 1 

2: 3 



2' 3 



Total, 119 19 90 28 26 20 2004 



12 



31 
90 
135 
66 
19 
51 

45 
63 
48 
53 
21 
25 
31 
25 
66 



D.C. 



29 30 



N. B. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CAf 
TALS; unordained Ministers in Italics; those marked thus, * were not present; frc 
Churches marked thus, t we received no intelligence, in that case their number star 

as last year; dashes denote no Pastors; the last column shews the monthly stat 

meetings of the Churches; the column before* the contributions from the Churches 
the Association fund, 



5. A petitionary lelfer, (for admission in this Association,.) from a 
Church lately constituted, at the Grindle Creek Meeting-house, Pitt coun- 
ty — another from the Church at the Old Ford, Beaufort county — also, an- 
other from the White Plains, Beaufort county, were handed in and read:— 
after satisfactory information was given, of their faith and order, they were 
received in this body, and manifested, by the Moderator giving the right 
hand of fellowship to their Messengers. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were called for, 
when one was handed in from the Neuse Associations by their Messenger^ 
Elder Thomas Dupeee, who seated himself with us. 

7. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Elders William 
Hyman, Joseph Biggs, Green Carrowan, and Thomas Dufree, to ex- 
amine the Circular Letter, brethren James Biggs and Benjamin F, Ebon, 
on finance. Brother William Clements, to write a letter of correspondence to 
the Neuse Association. The above committees to report on Monday next. 
Elder Joshua Lawrence, to prepare a Circular Letter for next Association. 

8. Elders William Hyman, Green Carrowan and Thomas Dupree, 
are requested, (by private ballot,) to oceupy the stage, by preaching on the 
morrow; divine worship to commence at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned until Monday morning, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, October 4th, 1S28. 
Elder Green Carrowan introduced the service of the day, and preach- 
ed from St. John x. chapter and 27th verse: "My sheep hear my voice, and 
1 know them, and they follow me/' Elder William Hyman followed., 
and preached from Proverbs, ix. chapter, 1st and 2d verses: "Wisdom hath 
builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven pillars, she hath killed her 
beasts; she hath mingled her wine; she hath also finished her table." Elder 
Thomas Dupree closed and preached from I Thessalonians, v. chapter, 
17th and part of the ISth verses: "Pray without ceasing, in every thing 
give thanks." From the earnestness of the preachers in preaching, and 
the good attention and order of the congregation, we hope much goodwill, 
follow the labors of the day. 

MONDAY MORNING, 6th October, 1S28. 

9. The Association being convened, and opened with prayer by the Mode- 
rator, proceeded to business. The committees appoinieti on Saturday were 
called on to report, when the one appointed to write to the Neuse Associa- 
tion handed in a letter, which was read and approved; and the following 
Messengers appointed to bear the same, with 30 copies of our last year's 
Minutes, (viz:) Elders Green Carrowan, Enoch Brickhouse, Luke* 
Ward and Joshua Lawrence. The committee to examine the Circular 
Letter reported, they had done so, and referred the same to the Association; 
the same was read, and it was resolved that the same be attached to these 
Minutes. The committee of finance reported, that they find in the hands 
of the Treasurer, at the close of the last Association, the sum of $50 671 

Received in contribution from the Churches at this time, - 29 30 

Making, *"$79 97^ 
Paid Elder Joseph Biggs, for preparing the minutes of last year 
for the press, superintending the printing, recording one copy 
on our Records, and distributing them as usual, - $10 00 
paying the Printer for striking 600 copies^ - 20 00 

Total expense, ~ $30 00 
Leaving a balance now in. the hands of the Treasurer of $4?"lp7i 



4 

The Association concurred with the report. 

10. Eider Joseph Biggs is requested 10 write a letter of correspondence 

to the Chowan Association, under the authority of this body, and send them J 
the usual number of these Minutes, and that Elders Enoch Brickhouse, 1 
William Clark, and Brethren Benjamin F. Ebon and Robert F. Lanier* 1 
be requested to be the bearers of the same to that Association. 

11. Resolved, that whereas this Association, did some years past, fix on 
fc temporary bound for her, (beginning on Roartoke river, at Hill's Ferry, 
running the direct road to Tarborough, on Tar river, and that the Associa- 
tion be held, one year above and the other below said bound,) as the said 
line did then nearly equally divide the Churches in the same — It is now 
resolved, that the aforesaid temporary bound be altered^ beginning on Roa- 
noke at Hamilton, running the direct road to Greenville on Tar river, and 1 
that the Association be held, orte year above, the other below said bound. 

12. Resolved, that our next Association be held at Little Conetoe Creek 
Meeting-house, Edgecombe county, to commence Saturday before the first j 
Sunday in October, 1S29, at 11 o'clock, A. M.. and Elder Green Carro- < 
"wan is requested to deliver an Introductory Sermon to that Association; ( 
and, in case of his failure, Elder Wm. Clark is requested to do the same. 

13. Whereas it is made known to this Association, that some person or 
persons have suggested, or said, that the decision of last Association, which 
was inserted in the 14th article of the Minutes, was nut agreeable to said j 
decision: Now it is resolved, that whereas many of the members of this j 
body were members of that body, that the article above said, was, and is \ 
now, the true spirit of the decision of that body; and that this body does | 
not approve of any alteration of said article; and that the Churches that com- , 
pose this body attend strictly thereto; and that the Editor for the Associa- , 
tion last year, attended strictly to the spirit of the decision of said body. 

13. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested to transcribe these Minutes for the 
press, superintend the printing, and have 500 copies struck, and distribute 
them as usual. 

The Association then adjourned to the time and place appointed, with 
Exhortation by the Moderator, and praver bv Elder Jo.«<eph Biggs. 

WILLIAM HYxMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



Circular. 

The Kehukee Association now sitting at North-Creek Meeting-house, 
Beaufort County, the 4th, 5th, and 6th days of October, 1S2S, to the 
several Churches they represent send greeting- 

Dearly beloved Brethren: Having been once more favored of God, 
with the privilege of assembling ourselves together in an Association capa- 
city, we feel it our duty as well as privilege to address you by way of Cir- 
cular as heretofore. Deriving our origin from the will of the Churches, we 
acknowledge it our duty to give them a detailed account of our proceedings 
for their inspection and approbation, which may be found in our Minutes, 
Which will be published and forwarded to them as usual. We have heard 
from most of the Churches and rejoice to inform you that brotherly love 
continues in most instances to abound amongst them. The God of Peace, 





who brought order out of confusion continues to smile upon us, and not- 
withstanding the old complaint of barrenness and coldness, are reiterated 
Son) some Churches and sections of this Association, yet there are others 
thai give us the glad tidings of the irrefragable reign of grace over the hearts 
of poor rebellions sinners. Grace has reigned like a mighty sovereign 
over some places, that have' from the memory of man, set in the valley of 
the shadow of death, bringing both old and young, rich and poor, with 
Streaming eyes to the feet of Jesus, asking mercy as poor condemned cul- 
prits. Here at the Throne of Grace, we have beheld husbands and wives, 
parents and children^ masters and servants, old and yonng, rich and poor, 
uniting their plaintive voices in praising and adoring the Lord of heaven 
and earth, for his unbounded goodness to such poor miserable rebels. Old 
saints have had their graces in lively exercise, their hopes confirmed, and 
their souls filled even to overflowing; when they have seen their partners, 
their children, their servants, their neighbors, coming to the Church, decla- 
ring that God continued to be gracious and merciful, in the forgiveness of 
sins, freely by his grace. The groanings of Israel have at length been heard 
of the Lord, The longing desires, the midnight groans of pious fathers and 
mothers, who have long since been mouldering in the cold, silent grave, 
have at last been heard and granted, in behalf of the children of their love, 
who yet remain in this vale of sorrows. What transports of joy must those 
sainted parents have felt, who have been in heaven for years, when the an- 
gels, who are ministering spirits to them who shall be made heirs of salva- 
tion, bore the glad tidings home, to those rcgi6ns of peace and unsullied 
bliss; yes, and the ministers too, who have been worn out in this world, in 
sowing the good seed of the kingdom, and watched with impatience, to see 
the precious fruit of their labors, but died without the sight. With what 
delight, with what rapturous joy, did they receive the' news from angel 
tongues, of the harvest now gathering from the seed they sowed years ago. 
Brethren and sisters, let us beseech you, to abound in the work of the Lord; 
for you are all laborers together with God. If you cannot preach, you can 
pray for those who do preach; you can pray for the prosperity of Zion; you 
can aid your poor ministers; you can loose them, and let them go. For the 
eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open to their cries; 
and be assured that, even a cup of cold water, given to one of Christ's lit- 
tle ones, will have its appropriate reward. The Association further avail 
themselves of their constitutional power, as an atlviserv counsel, would 
obtrude upon the attention of the Churches the following observations:— 
We profess, dear brethren, to derive our origin, doctrine, and ordinances, 
from the word of God, as most of the religious societies do; and whilst we 
freely concede to others, the same privilege that we claim for ou rselves, we 
nevertheless, cannot abandon the right of judging of the quajjfications of 
those who may wish to become one of our number. In all communities, 
(civil as well as religious,) there must exist an identity of interest, as well 
as principle; otherwise, discord, confusion, and ultimate ruin, must and will 
be the unavoidable consequence: "For two cannot walk together, except 
they be agreed. We do contend, that there is but one Lord, one faith, 
and one baptism. And as we believe that the doctrine of election and pre- 
destination, or salvation, through a crucified Redeemer, without the deeds 
! of the law, is the only revelation, which God has made in his word, and 
\ that nothing short of the imputation of the perfect righteousness of Jesus 
Christ, will avail a soul in a comingday; therefore, we object to receiving, 
or holding in fellowship, in our Churches, an individual whose views on 



this subject are inimical to our own. We disclaim any intention of putting 
shackles on religious freedom, which is the inherent right of others, as 
well as our own; but as there are religious societies, to suit almost every 
man's views, (and where that is not the case, he may if he chooses, become 
the founder of a new one,) we object to bavins; our principles and faith 
adulterated, by the admission of heterogenous principles into the Baptist 
Churches. Nor can the Association conceive any possible motive, founded 
in purity, for inducing Armenians to join, or continue, in a predestinarian 
Baptist Church, when they know that it must and will produce discord and 
confusion. We recommend such to go out from amongst us, and go to, 
their own company. And we also recommend, and advise the Churches, 
to act promptly, but with a christian temper towards such; for however 
small it may reduce our numbers, they are a dead weight, with which the 
church of God has to travel. We further advise the churches, to keep a 
steady and faithful eye to their ministers; for in all countries, • 'I ike priest, 
like people." For the extent of mischief, which may be done, by a disaf- 
fected Baptist minister, is not yet developed. The seed which they sow, 
produces discord and disunion between churches, and between members of 
the same church: and to consummate the evil and distress, produces cold- 
ness, indifference, and a want of christian love, between the builders of the 
spiritual edifice; and in time* would produce a scene, at which hearts, not 
as hard as adamant, must weep. And furthermore, the morality of your 
ministers, should be closely inspected, as well as their principles; and when 
you weigh them in the balance, "and find them wanting," you should un- 
hesitatingly stop them from preaching, until "they bring forth fruit, meet 
for repentance. " We will close this part of our admonitions, by earnest- 
ly pressing upon your attention and observance, that portion of scripture, 
recorded in second epistle of John, 10th and 11th verses: <k If there come 
any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, 
neither hid him God speed; for he that biddeth him God speed, is partaker 
of his evil deeds." You will please to pardon us, dear brethren, for tres- 
passing upon your time a little longer, by making a few laconic observa- 
tions in relation to the doctrine of election. In the doing of which, we 
must acknowledge our obligations in part, to the pen of another individual. 
"This doctrine is supposed by many* to imply an insuperable obstacle, in 
the way of man's salvation; but like the others with it, is often misunder- 
stood. And the consequences which it has been supposed to involve, have 
been deduced, not from the doctrine as taught in the scriptures; but from 
.erroneous, and distorted views, which have been given it by its opposers." 
What is the doctrine of Election? It is simply this; that God has deter- 
mined, to make some of the human race, willing to embrace the Gospel. 
This you will at once perceive, supposes no obstacle in the sinner's way to 
heaven; but his own will. The doctrine of election rests on the same foun^. 
dation, as the doctrine of regeneration. Regeneration is indeed election 
carried into effect. What God decreed in election, in regeneration he exe- 
cutes. And if the doctrine of regeneration, implies no obstacle in the sin- 
ner's way to salvation, except what lies in his own will, the doctrine of 
election implies no other obstacle. Many however seem to suppose, that 
if this doctrine be true, a part of the human race is bound over by it, to ir- 
recoverable ruin; and thus make God, the efficient cause of reprobation, as 
well as of election. Hence the excuse, which is so often in the mouth of 
the stupid and profane sinner: "If I am elected I shall be saved, do what I 
v.illy and if I am not elected. I shall not be saved, do what I can." A VQpXS 



7 

gross and palpable perversion of the doctrine, could not be invented. And 
the declaration is as absurd, as if I were to say, God knows whether or not 
I am to live another year, and if he does know that, I shall be alive twelve 
months hence, (and his knowledge of future events, are as certain and un- 
changeable as the past,) I shall be, although I were presumptuously to 
plunge myself into the midst of the sea. The doctrine of election, binds no 
man over to perdition; the Almighty never made a human being, to send 
him to hell. And although he has elected in Christ, countless numbers to 
everlasting felicity; he never elected, nor predestined, any individual for 
misery. Election flows from the love of God, according to his eternal pur- 
pose; and reprobation, from sin, and the wilful obstinacy of man. It hin- 
ders iio man from coming to Christ, who is willing to come; or from taking 
the water of life freely. To make the subject plain, let us suppose for a 
moment, that the docirine is not true. We will suppose, that those who 
deny the doctrine, will be willing to grant, that mankind are free agents; 
that they have the freedom of will; that Christ has died; and that in the 
Gospel, salvation is freely offered to all. But we will suppose, that God has 
not determined to make any of the human race, willing to comply with the 
terms of salvation; but has left this point, to be determined by each indivi- 
dual for himself. If this were the real state of the case, it will be easily 
seen by all, that there would be no obstacle in the way of man's salvation* 
but his own will. Now what alteration in the circumstances, of mankind, 
does the doctrine of election make? Why, it renders it certain, that some 
shall comply with the terms of salvation; with regard to the rest, it does 
not affect their situation at all. Their situation is the same, that it would 
have been, if there had been no decree, of election. They are still free to 
act — salvation is freely offered; the door of heaven stands open; and they 
may all enter if they will. There is nothing to exclude them, from the ce- 
lestial paradise, but their own voluntary obstinacy. The doctrine of elec- 
tion therefore, alters the condition of no man for the worse; although it al- 
ters the condition of many for the better. "'Twas mercy filled the throne, 
when the purpose of election was conceived." Why, let us ask, is this 
doctrine viewed with such terror, and alarm? Why does it awaken such 
enmity, in the sinner's bosom, and sometimes fill him even with horror? 
Is it a dreadful thought, that God has looked with an eye of mercy, on this 
apostate world; and that when he saw the whole human race, plunging into 
eternal misery, he determined to reserve some, and make them trophies of 
redeeming grace? Is it a dreadful thought, that God has rendered it certain 
that some of our wretched, guilty race, shall ascend to the mansions of the 
blessed, and join the society of cherubim and seraphim; shall his holy name 
be blasphemed, for this wondrous display of love and mercy? Why should 
the doctrine of election trouble sinners? Of what are they afraid? Are 
they afraid, that their names are in the book of life? If not, there is no^ 
thing contained in it, which need awaken their fears. If an individual is 
not elected, his state is no worse than he would be, if the doctrine were not 
true. If it has altered his circumstances at all, it has altered it for the bet- 
ter. If it has not rendered his salvation certain, he is just where he would 
have been, and all the world with him, had no decree of election ever ex- 
isted. It is evident from the scriptures, that we must be born again; this 
new birth, therefore, must be produced either by the power of God, or the 
power of man; and we are persuaded, that no person will ascribe it to the 
latter; for that would involve an absurdity, which must be apparent even to 
the weakest capacity: ; We take it. then, as being granted by all professing 



8 * 3W | 

christians, that, to be born again, is to be born of God. And the radical 
change, effected in the soul of man, is produced by "the working of his 
mighty power, which he wrought in Christ, when lie raised him from the 
dead." Here then, we would ask; can any but God, work this great change 
in man? We answer confident)}-, scrjpturally, and experimentally, No. 
We ask again, is it right that God should do it? We answer that it is 
right, according to scripture. If then it be right, for God, to bestow this 
grace, upon an individual, how can it. be wrong for him, previously to have 
determined to do il? And this previous determination, is what we express, 
by the term election. But a question might here arise; if God has an elect 
number, how can this be reconciled to'th'e universal call, which you give in 
the gospel? As you are commanded to preach to every creature. We an- 
swer, that as man's disability, is of a moral, or intellectual, and not of a phy- 
sical character; that our preaching or exhortations are directed to his men- 
tal, and not his natural powers, if man was physically, or corporeally, dis- 
qualified, from the service of God; then we admit, that it would be as rea- 
sonable, to preach to the dead, in their graves, as to preach to the living^ 
but as they possess all the powers, of both soul and body, requisite for the 
service of God* and as they were bestowed upon them for that end, we 
therefore direct our observations, to the rational powers of the soul, whiclj 
governs the will. In a sinner's conversion to God, there is no new faculty, 
either of scul or bo dy, bestowed upon him; it is only changing, and giving 
a proper direction, to those which he originally possesses. It is, "clothing 
ot him in his right mind;" in the doing of this, therefore, we discharge the 
mandate directed to us as ministers, and look to God, to bless it, without 
which we know it to be in vain. For Jesus Christ himself, expressly 
affirms that, "No man can come unto me, except the Father, which hath 
sent me, draw him." Not that God has interposed any obstacle in the sin- 
tier's way; not that he has decreed, that he should not come to Christ; for no 
decree was necessary; his nature, his sins, and his wilful obstinacy, will for- 
ever keep him at a perishable distance from Christ, unless God does inter- 
pose, and remove those barriers out of the way: When this is effected, the 
prayer is then, "Draw me, Lord, and I will run after thee." Here you 
perceive, that the will is changed, the desires of the soul are given a differ- 
ent direction. We will stop here for a moment, to remove from off the 
pure gold, the dust which the enemies of the truth have cast ©n it. They 
attempt to associate reprobation and election together; and represent us to 
say, that they emanated from God. This we flatly deny; for God has n# 
more agency in the reprobation, or condemnation, of a sinner, than a righ- 
teous judge has in that of a criminal, when he pronounces the sentence of 
the law against him. There is no book of death, there is no election to 
condemnation, there is no eternal purpose of God, to send men and women 
to hell. There is no decree passed, that man should sin, in order that he 
might be damned. There was no counsel of death called, there was no co- 
venant of wrath entered into by the Trinity* But on the contrary, man has 
reprobated himself. They became vessels of wrath, fitted for destruction, 
by their own wicked works. They have made, "A covenant with death, 
and with hell are at agreement." Isaiah, 2Sth chap. 15th verse. They are 
invito by the ministers, to come to Christ; but they will not have him to 
reign over them. Life and death are by the gospel presented to their 
choice; and they choose -death, raiherthan life, because their corrupt nature 
2nd polluted souls call, "bitter sweet, and sweet bitter;" and they are by 
valine, planning out some way, by wbich they will be happy, here an4 



9 

hereafter; but it is the "way that leadeth to death. ?? And those to whom 
this Circular is addressed, cannot plead ignorance; they cannot say they 
never were invited to come to Christ, or that they were prevented, by 
some fatal decree from God. They connot say, that they have no revela- 
tion from God; or that he has concealed himself from them, but will have 
to confess, that when they "knew God, they glorified him, not as God ? 
neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations; and their 
foolish hearts were darkened." Romans, 1st and 21st. This is the view ? 
which we take of reprobation; and this is the situation, and end, of the non- 
elect; and, but for election, of every son and daughter of Adam's long line 
of descendants. We have shewn you, what reprobation is, and from 
whence it emanaced; we have shewn you what Gqd nas done to instruct 
sinners, and reveal himself to them; and what use, without election, they 
would all make of them.- Look around you and behold, the dreadful pros- 
titution, of the benevolence of deity, which every where prevails; that 
which was given as a blessing, they make their eurse. And although they 
live every moment, upon the bounty, and goodness of Godj yet they blas- 
pheme his name, "and are unthankful." Now let us see, what election,, 
(which resulted from the love, not the hatred, of deity,) hath done, that it 
should be so hated; that so many should pray to have their eyes closed 
against it; and that, the few feeble asserters of it, should be stigmatised, as 
misanthropes, and their names cast out as evil. 1st, It produced a council 
of peace, Zech. Q and 13: "Even he shall build the temple of the Lordj 
and he shall bear the glory; and shall sit and rule upon his throne; and the 
council of peace, shall be between them both." And in the fullness, of the 
stipulated time, in conformity with the provisions, of this council of peace, 
"Jesus Christ, came, and preached peace, (not wrath,) to them which were 
afar off, as well as to them which were nigh." Eph. 2 and 17. Never was 
such a council held as this; between such persons, and on such a momen- 
tous and interesting affair. "God was in Christ, reconciling the world to 
himself; not imputing their trespasses to them." 2 Cor. 5 and 19. That is, 
in this council of peace, God was in Christ, constituting a system, by which 
their sins might be imputed to Jesus, and not unto them." Isaiah, 53 and 
11: "He shall see the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied; by his 
knowledge, shall my righteous servant justify many, for he shall bear their 
iniquities." 2 Cor. $ and 20: "For he hath made him to be sin for us 9 
who knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him." 
It also produced a covenant of peace, (and not wrath,) Isaiah. £4 and 10: 
."For the mountains shall ; depart, and the hills be removed; but my kind- 
ness shall not depart from thee; neither shall the covenant of my peace be 
removed; saith the Lord, that hath mercy on thee. " Jesus Christ, is ajlso 
the elect of God the Father. Isaiah, 42 and 1st: "Behold my servant 
whom I uphold, mine elect in whom my soul delighteth; I have put my spi- 
rit upon him, and he shall bring forth judgment to the Gentiles." And 
Matthew appropriates ihis prophecy to him, in his 12th chapter and 8th 
yerse: "Behold my servant, whom I have chosen? my beloved, in whom 
my soul is well pleased; I will put my spirit upon him, and he shall shew 
judgment unto the Gentiles." This doctrine of election, extends also to 
fallen man. 1st Peter, 1st and 1st: "Elect according to the foreknowledge 
of God the Father; through sanctification of the spirit, unto obedience; and 
jsprinkling the blood of Jesus Christ." Here you perceive, that God had 
decreed, the sanctification, and obedience of the individual; as well as his 
>;>.h T ation; and this is performed, by the Holy Ghost, making an application 



lo 

bi the blood of Jesus Christ, to the soul; which in regeneration, cleanses it 
from all sin; and prepares him, for the enjoyment of that blessedness which 
election had destined him for. And if he^was permitted after conversion^ 
to become so far disobedient as to finally perish, then the purpose of God, 
in election, would be defeated: which never is the case. For they are not 
at their own disposal, but "are kept by the power of God, through faith 
unto salvation; ready to be revealed in the last time." 1st Peter, 1st and 5th. 
And that the elect are under the peculiar care of God 5 may he inferred from 
Matt. 24th chap, 22d verse: "And except those days should be shortened; 
there should no flesh be saved; but for the elect's sake, those days shall be 
shortened." And the impossibility of their being deceived, may be infer- 
red, from the 24th verse: "There shall arise false Christs, and false proph- 
ets, and shall shew great signs and wonders, insomuch that if it were possi- 
ble, they shall deceive the very elect." And the great Apostle to the Gen- 
tiles, whilst treating upon the subject, asks in triumphant language, "Who 
shall lay any thing, to the charge of God's elect? It is God, that justified^ 
Who is he that 'condemneth? It is Christ, that died; yea rather, is risen 
again, who ever is at the right hand of God; who maketh intercession for 
us." Romans Sthj 33 and 34. Let us stop, and wonder;, and adore, the 
wisdom and the goodness of God; in fixing such a stable foundation, for the 
Salvation of any of the human race. Yes, stable as the pillars of heaven; 
firm as the throne upon which he sits; and over which, the united forces of 
hell can never prevail. For were it less secure in all things; Jesus Christ, 
might indeed have died in vain. And to guard these divine truths, from 
the imputation of affording an apology for licentiousness, or an encourage- 
ment to sin; the apostle in writing to his Collossian brethren, charges them 
"to put on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mer- 
cy, kindness* humbleness of mind, meekness, long suffering, forbearing one 
another, forgiving one another," &c. Col. 3 and 12. The graces here enu- 
merated, are not the product of corrupt nature; but they are the, gift of the 
Holy Ghost And Christians are invested with them; and commanded to 
put them on as a garment, to adorn and beautify their christian character, 
that all may take knowledge, that they have been with Jesus. There is 
also a book of life, (not of death,) in which the very names of the elect are 
inscribed. Phil. 4 and 3— Rev. 3 and 5, and 13 and 8; "And all that dwell 
Upon the earth, shall worship him, whose names are not written in the book 
of life; of the Lamb, slain from the foundation of the world." Rev. 17 
and 8; "And they that dwell on the earth, shall wonder, (whose names are 
not written in the book of life, from the foundation of the world,)" &o. 
Rev. 20 chap. 12 and 15 verse: "And I saw the dead, small and great, stand 
before God; and the books were opened; and another book was opened, 
which is the book of life, &c. and whosoever was not found written, in the 
book bfiife, was east into the lake of tire." Many of the difficulties, which 
this doctrine is supposed to involve, will be obviated, by reflecting that it 
is God's doings, and not man's; that it is founded, in eternal wisdom, and 
perfect righteousness; and by him who declares the end from the begin- 
ning; and from ancient times, the things which are not yet done; saying, 
"My councils shall stand, and I will do all mf pleasure." Isaiah, 46 and 10, 
Not that he takes pleasure in the death of the wicked, any more than a hu* 
man Judge would, in passing sentence of death upon a criminal. But the 
pleasure of the Lord, shall prosper in the hands of Christ, in the salvation 
of the elect; and if the rest perish, it is only the just wages of sin; and their 
Salvation is only what the situation of all would be, but for the decree of 



election. This blessedness for the elect, was secured in Christ, before the 
foundation of the world; according to Eph. 1st and 1st: "According as ha 
has chosen us, in him, before the foundation of the world, (not b.ecause that 
we were,) but that we might he, holy and without blame, before him, in 
Jove; ver^e 5th, Having predestinated us, unto the adoption of children, by 
Jesus Christ, unto himself; verse 6lh, To the praise of the glory of his 
grace, (not our works,) wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved. 
Verse 11th, In whom we have also, obtained an inheritance; being predesti- 
nated, according to the purpose of him, who worketh all things after the 
counsel of his own will. Verse 12th, That we should be, to the praise of 
his glory, who first trusted in Christ, Verse 13th, In whom we also trust- 
ed, after that ye heard, the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, in 
whom also? aft-dr y^ believed, ye were sealed with the Holy Spirit of prom- 
ise. Verse J4ttj« Which is the earnest, of our inheriiance, until the re- 
demption, of the purchased possession, unto the praise of his glory. " We 
might also add, many instances directly in point. The prophets were all 
chosen of God; for he sen\his word unto them, and not unto others. He 
chose his apostles, John, 15 and 16, "Ye have not chosen me, but I have 
chosen you, and ordained you, that you should go, and bring forth fruit, 
&c." Acts, 9 and 15: "But the Lord said untq him, (Anrianias,) go thy 
way, for he, (Saul,) is a chosen vessel, to bear my name, before the gentiles 
and kings, and children of Israel." Acts, 22 and 14th, "And when An- 
nanias went to Saul, he said unto him, the God of our fathers, has chosen 
thee, that thou shouldest know hjs will, and see that just one, and should 
hear the voice of his mouth. " Acts, 18 and 6th, "And when they Opposed 
themselves, and blasphemed, he (Paul,) shook his raiment, and said unto 
fhem; your blood be upon your own heads; I am clean; from henceforth I 
will go unto the gentiles. Verse 7th, He departed thence, and entered in- 
Jo a certain man's house, named Justus, one that worshipped, whose house 
joined hard to the synagogue. Verse 8th, And Crispus, the chief ruler of 
the synagogue, believed on the Lord, with all his house; and many of the 
Corinthians hearing, believed, and w T ere baptized. Verse 9th, Then spake 
the Lord, to Paul in night by a vision, be not afraid but speak, and hold not 
thy peace. Ver. 10th, For I am with thee, and no man shall set on thee to 
hurt thee; for I have much people in this city. Ver. 11th, And he contin- 
ued there, a year and six months. " And if jt were necessary, to multiply 
instances, to prove that God would save, and has saved, his elect, we might 
refer you to the case of Philip and the Eunuch, in the Sth chapter of Acts: 
and to the case of the thief on the cross, as well as others. In the latter 
case, there was^two human beings, that had both, been declared by their 
countrymen, to be unworthy to live; they were abandoned wretches; we 
are informed, that when they ascended the place of execution, the one was 
placed on the one hand, and the other on the other; they both reviled him, 
and required of him, to give an evidence of his being the son of God, by 
saving them, as well as himself. Before the fatal blow was struck, one of 
them seems to be stricken* with relentings, and reprimanded his associate in 
villany, acknowledges his own crime, justifies the Redeemer, and mourn- 
fully prays, "Lora when thou comest to thy kingdom, remember me." 
When the compassionate Saviour, kindly promised a compliance with his 
request. Now here were two individuals, similar situations, equally pos - 
sessed of those powers of the soul, to choose or refuse, and equally in a sit- 
uation, to be affected and convinced, by the tragical scenes of that ever me- 
morable day. Yet we perceive that one of them, died an impenitent sinner 



12 

whilst the other, was promised a residence in Paradise thai very day. How 
will this difference, between the death of the two, be accounted for? One 
might say, it was because one prayed, and the pther did not. But how, let 
us ask, came one to pray, and the other not? We are not informed, that 
there were naturally any difference between them. And how came one to 
repent, and confess his sins; and the other to die, an impenitent? It is im- 
possible for us to account, for the diifeienee, upon any other principle than, 
"He wili have mercy, upon whom he will have mercy." And that he was 
graciously pleased, to bestow repentance upon one, and withhold it, from 
the other, in the same way, that lie does now, that "He is exalted a Prince, 
and a Saviour, to give repentance unto Israel, and forgiveness of sins." 
Acts, 5 and 31st. Nor can there be the least injustice, or inhuman'^ in 
this transaction, but on the contrary, an exhibition of unbounded compassion. 
They both had forfeited their lives, they were both justly obnoxious, to 
the wrath of God; and he who would complain, because both were not sav- 
ed, would also complain, because the whole human race were not saved } . 
and that all will be saved, no bible reader can believe. Here then we mus/t 
arrive at this conclusion, that if all were sent to hell, yet God would have 
been just; and the saving of any, and making them heirs and joint heirs 
with him, is an act of sovereign grace and mercy. But it might be asked, 
how can the doctrine of election, be reconciled with the universal benevo- 
lence of Deity? There are doubtless many questions, that might be started, 
by a curious mind; which it might be difficult, if not impossible to solve. Nor 
is this to be wondered at; the same difijculty attends us, in our present state ? 
respecting almost all the works of God. No man could solve one half, of 
the difficulties, that might be staited, concerning God's goodness, in crea- 
ting the world; when he knew all th it would follow. The same might be 
paid, of many things in the scheme of divine providence. The three per- 
sons in the Trinity, is a mystery which we must receive, upon the authori- 
ty of divine revelation; and we believe it as much, as though we could ex- 
plain it: because it is clearly revealed in the scripture. The union of soul 
and body, and their, necessary connection, with each other is a mystery, 
which none can solve; and yet it is believed by all. 1 How spirit can act up- 
on matter, is another mystery, which none understands; but that *'the an- 
gels, are ministering spirits, to them who shall be made heirs of salvation," 
is a truth clearly revealed in scripture. And as to the connection between 
election, and God's benevolence to his creatures, we firmly believe, both, 
because they are revealed in the scripture; and we are fully satisfied, that 
those who are placed, on the left hand, at the great day of judgment, will 
stand without an excuse; before the judge of heaven and earth; because we 
believe, that God is perfectly righteous, holy, just and good in all his ways, 
whether we can explain, or reconcile his works with those attributes or not; 
yet they operate in all of his acts. But as the number of the elect, is com- 
paratively small, it may be asked; How is it consistent with the love and 
goodness of God, that the majority should be punished; and made monu- 
ments of justice, for the benefit of the small number? To this query, we 
will reply in the language of an able writer; he observes, "that though it be 
equally evident from scripture and observation, that the greater part of 
mankind, go down to perdition, in the smooth, broad, descending road of 
sin, in the ordinary ages of the world; and though revelation assures us, 
that the number of apostate angels, is very great; yet he thinks, we have np 
reason to conclude, that the greater part, of the rational creation, shall be 
miserable. Nay it is possible, that the number of those on whom the 



18 

penalty of the divine law is inflicted, may bear no more proportion to iha* 
of the innumerable ranks of creatures, that may be retained, in obedience^ 
and happiness, by means of their conspicuous, and exemplary punishment, 
than the number of criminals, executed in a government, for warning to 
others, bears to the rest of the subjects. " If we -consider that those who 
have been redeemed* from the earth, even in the ordinary ages of the world ? 
though comparatively but few, yet absolutely are, "4 multitude which no 
man can number, out of every kindred, people, and language." Rev, 8an4 
9. And that the elect angels, are an innumerable company; Heb. 12 and 
22; perhaps much greater than the legions of hell. If to these we add, the 
prodigious numbers that shall be converted, it) that Jong and blessed sea- 
son, when satan shall be bound; when the Prince of Peace shall reign, and 
when "The kingdom and" dominion, and the greatness of the kingdom un- 
der the whole heaven, shall be given to the people of the saints of the most 
high," Dan. 7 and 27th. In which jiot only the greater number of thega*- 
nerations shall live, in that glorious millenium, shall be saved, but perhaps, 
a greater number, than all that perished, in former generations; which is 
very possible^ if we consider the long continuance of that time; and that 
the world will then be under tjie peculiar blessings of heaven, and conse- 
quently mankind, will multiply faster, and not be diminished, as they now 
are, by the calamities of war, plagues, epidemical sicknesses ? and the other 
judgments of God, upon those times of rebellion. If we also borrow a lit- 
tle light, from the hypothesis of philosophy, and suppose that the other pla- 
nets of our system, are peopled like our earth, with proper inhabitants, and 
particularly with reasonable creatures; (for he that made them vast bodies, 
made them not in vain, he made them to be inhabited;) if we farther sup- 
pose, thai each of the innumerable fixed stars, is a sun, the centre of habit- 
able worlds, and that all these worlds, like our own, swarm with life, and 
particularly, with various classes of reasonable beings; (which is not at all 
unlikely, if we argue from parity of cases, from things well known, to things 
less known, or from the immense overflowing goodness, wisdom, and powd- 
er, of the great creator, who can replenish the infinite void, of space with 
being, life and reason, and with equal ease, produce and support, ten thou- 
sand worlds, as ten thousand grains.) If we suppose, that his creative per- 
fections, will not lie inactive forever, contented with one execution for six 
days, but that he still employs, and will employ them, forever in creating 
new worlds, replenished with moral agents, to start into existence, here 
and there, in the endless, vacancies of space; and finally, if we suppose, that 
the flarnes of hell, will blaze dreadfully bright, and conspicuous, in the view 
of all present, and future creations, or that the destructive nature of sin, 
will be some way or another, be made known, tQ the rational inhabitant^ 
of all worlds, by the punishments inflicted, upon a number of men and an- 
gels, and that by this means, they are effectually deterrejd from sin, ahdL 
preserved from misery, inseparable from it. We say if we admit, thes^ 
suppositions, some of which are undoubtedly true, and the rest we think not 
improbable, then it will follow, that the number of holy, and happy crea- 
tures in the universe, will be incomparably greater, than that of miserable 
criminals; and that the punishing of the latter, is one principal mean, of 
preserving, this infinite number, in obedience and happiness; and conse- 
quently is highly conducive to the public happiness, and expressive of th$ 
love, and goodness of the universal ruler, to the immense community of hi? 
subjects. We know that "God is love;" and that his moral and divine go- 
vernment, are both under its benign influence, althpugh weperceire ? that i$ 



14f - ' * :t I, : 

She distribution of his favours, he makes one rich, and another, who we 'fa£f 
think is more deserving, lives and dies in poverty and obscurity. We are 
satisfied that notwithstanding we are incompetent to explain the divine pro- 
ceedure, in these matters, that tbey are ali founded, in consummate wisdom; 
and goodness, and therefore demands our concurrence. It is sometimes al- 
leged, that the doctrine of election, destroys the freedom of man's will, or 
his free agency, and makes him a mere machine, which God puts into ope- 
ration, either with a view to his condemnation^ or salvation, without the! 
concurrence or agency of the individual. We think that we have shewn" 
before, that although Salvation is the free gift of God, yet that condemna- 
tion, is the just wages of sin. Man evidently is a free agent, and has the 
perfect freedom of his will; he is at liberty freelj r , and voluntarily to choose 
or refuse, otherwise he could not be an accountable beings and the Will 4s 
will, must be free; or there is no such faculty of the mind. The important 
question therefore arises, What is the will? We answer, that it may be de- 
fined, to bq that faculty of the Soul, by which he chooses or refuses, any 
thing presented to it. Adam; when he Was created, had both the will and 
power to serve God, but by his fall, his soul became corrupt and polluted; 
which corruption and pollution, has been transmitted by ordinary descent 
io us. ("For a clean thing cannot come out of an unclean.") And the 
will is under the direction of the mind, or influenced by* the volitions of the 
soul. Man therefore has lost all ability^ to will any thing, which is spirit- 
ually good, until divine ^race, enlightens the understanding, and changes 
the heart. It therefore appears to us, exceedingly plain, that man in nig 
fallen state, can only wil) according to his fallen capacities. And that how- 
ever free and voluntary the will may be* yet it is under the control of the 
ic carnal mind, which is enmity to God." When divine grace changes the 
soul, it being as free to will as it was before, it wills to serye God; and now 
that the soul is changed, it serves God as freely, and voluntarily, as when 
in a state of nature, it served the devil, and the iusts of the flesh. We will 
explain our views of the subject, by the following figures; the streams 
Which are tributary to the ocean, {low from their source, freely and volun- 
tarily, until they empty into their great repository; and so they would con- 
tinue to do, until the end of time, unless obstructed. You wish to divert 
the stream from its accustomed channel, you dam across it, and stop its pro- 
gress; you then open a new channel, according to your previous design ? 
through which the water flows as freely, as it did formerly in its natural 
channel; it is the same water, only you have given it a different direction; 
just so it is with fallen man, being left free to will and to act, the volitions 
of the soul flow unrestrained down the channel of nature; until 6od enlight- 
ens the understanding to see the dreadful end. The sinner then stops, for 
he firds it is death to proceed; this he wills to do; and when God changes 
the heart, and opens to li is mind a new channel, for him to proceed in; he 
acts as freely in pursuing this new course, as he did in pursuing his natural 
one. And thus the will is, and ever will remain free. We also believe in 
the free agency of man, as well as the decrees and purposes of God. And 
it is evident from scripture, and reason, that there is a consistency between 
them; which will be illus!rated,by the following facts: 1. "The time of man's 
life is appointed of God." Is there not an appointed time to man upon 
earth? Are not his days also, like the (lays of an hireling? "His days are 
determined, the number of his months are with thee; thou hast appointed 
his bounds, that he cannot pass; all the days of my appointed time, will I 
wilt until my change come," And yet men are exhorted, to use means^ tc 



1% ' ""I^PPP^ 
prolong their lives; arid actually do use those means, as if there was no ap- 
pointment in the case. God determines to send afflictions to individuals 
and families, and he may have determined, that those afflictions shall termi- 
nate in death. Nevertheless, it is God's revealed will, that they should 
use means for their recovery, as if there were no determination in the 
affair. Children were exhorted to honor their parents, that their days might 
he long, in the land which the Lord their God had given them. He that 
desired life, and loved many days, was exhorted to keep his tongue from 
evil, and his lips from speaking guile. If by excess or neglect, any one 
come to what is called an untimely endj we are not to suppose either that 
God is disappointed, or the Sinner exculpated. 2dly. Our portion in this 
life is represented, as coming under the divine appointment; it is a cup, a 
lot, a heritage. David spoke of his portion, as laid out for him, by line; "the 
line says lie. is Fallen to me in pleasant places; yea' I have a goodly herit 
age. The times before appointed, are determined, and the bounds of our 
habitation are fixed. " It is a satisfaction to an humble mind, that his time 
and concerns, are in the hands of a wise God; and that he has the choosing 
pf his inheritance. And yet in all the concerns of life, we are exhorted to 
act with discretion; as much as if there was no divine Providence. The 
purposes of God extend to the bitter part of our portion ; ^as well as the 
sweet. Tribulations are things to which it is said, we are appointed. Nor 
is it a mere general determination. Of all the ills that befell an afflicted 
Job, not one came unordained; cutting and complicated as they were. He 
calmly acknowledged this, and it was matter of relief under his troubles. 
f'He performeth the ihing, that is appointed for me, and many such things 
are with him.- Nevertheless there are things, having a tendency to fill up 
his cup, with either happiness, or misery; and it is well known, that men 
are exhorted, to pursue the one, and avoid the other; the same as if there 
were no divine purpose whatever, in the affair. Thirdly, events which 
imply, the evil actions of men, come under the divine appointment. The 
visitation with which Job was afflicted, was of God's sending. He himself 
knew this, and acknowledged it. And yet this did not hinder, but that the 
Sabeans, and Chaldeans, acted as freely in what they did; and that it was 
their duty, tq have acted differently. Assyria, was God's rod, to Judah; 
and the staff in their hands, was his indignation. And yet Assyria, ought 
hot to have oppressed Judah; pride, covetousness, and cruelty, were their 
tnotives. For all which they were called to an account, and punished. 
Our Lord was delivered, according to the determinate counsel and fore- 
knowledge of God. His worst enemies did nothing to him, but what 
his hand, and this counsel had determined to be done. And yet this did 
not hinder, but that with wicked hands, they crucified and slew him. That 
the contrary of all this, was their duty, and that the invitations aud expos- 
tulations of our Lord, with them, were founded in propriety and sincerity. 
God did not determine, to give Judas a heart to forbear, betraying his mas- 
ter, when tempted by the lucre of gain. On the contrary, he determined 
to give him up to his own heart's lust. The Son of Man in being betrayed, 
went as it was determined; and yet there was a woe due to, and denounsed 
against, the horrid perpetration notwithstanding. Exclamations may a- 
bound, but facts are stubborn things. It is likely we may be told, that if 
t!*is be the case, we need not be uneasy about it; for it is, as God would 
have it. If God has ordained it, why should we oppose it? But such a 
mode of ohjecting, (as observed before,) though of ancient, is not of very 
honorable extraction. If it be not identically the same, which was ms^f 



10 the apostolic doctrine; it is certainly very near a kin to it. We can dis- 
cover no difference; except in words. "Thou wilt say then; why dost he 
yet find fault; for who has resisted his will?" To which it was thought 
sufficient to reply: "Nay but who art thou, man, that repliest against 
God." We would further remark, that there is a great difference, between 
an efficient, and permissive determination, in respect to the existence, of 
moral evil. To assign the former to the divine being, is to make him the 
author of sin; but not so, the latter. That God does permit evil, is a fact 
that cannot be disputed. And if we admit the perfections, of his moral cha- 
racter, it must be allowed to be consistent with his righteousness; whether 
we can fully conceive of it, or not. And if it be consistent with the righ- 
teousness of God, to permit evil; it cannot he otherwise to determine, so to 
do; unless it be wrong to determine to do, what is right. And lastly elec- 
tion, extends to the angels, and their ultimate empleyment. That a part of 
them, owe their present blessedness to election, as will appear from 1st 
Tim. 5 and 21st, "I charge thee before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, and 
the elect angels," &c. And when Jesus Christ shall have finished his me- 
diatorial work, and isahout to gather his saints or the elect home to glory; 
these elect angels, will be commissioned by him, as will appear from Matt. 
S4 and 31st: ''He shall send his angels, with the sound of a great trumpet, 
and they shall gather his elect, from the four winds, from one end of hea- 
ven, to the other." And this last act §f an incarnate God, will close the 
beneficent purposes of election. 



Free Press — Tarboro' N. G: 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist dissociation 

HOLDEN At 



JAUle Conetoe Creek Meeting-House? 
EDGECOMBE COUNTY, 



The Zd, m, and 5th of October, 1829. 



SATURDAY, October 3d, 1S29. 
J. . The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Elder William 
Clark, (who was appointed in case of failure of Elder Green 
Carrowan,) from Mark xyi. chap, and 15th verse: "And he said 
unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to ev- 
ery creature." Prayer by Elder Lemuel Boss. 

2. The Association then convened, and being opened with 
prayer, by Elder William Hyman; proceeded to choose Elder 
William Hyman, Moderator; Brother Benj, F. Eborn, Clerk $ 
and Brother Joseph D. Biggs, Assistant Clerk. 

3. Brethren in the ministry, (present,) from sister Associations, 
(not messengers to this,) were invited to seats with us; when El- 
ders Congleton and Mo ye, from the Neuse Association, and 
Brother Raynor from the Chowan Association, accepted the in- 
vitation, and seated themselves with us. 

4. Letters from thirty -four Churches, were read, the messen- 
gers names enrolled, took the following account from the Ch„w> 
gfcfigfj as stated in the Table of Churches. 



CHURCHES. 



1 Baregrass, — 

2 Blum's Creek, — 

3 Conoho, — 
A Conetoe, — 

5 Conco?'d, 

6 Cross Roads, 

7 Deep, Creek, — 

8 Falls Tar River, ]- 

9 Fishing Creek, 

10 Fiat Swamp, 

11 Frying Pan,— 

12 Goose Creek, 

13 Great Swamfi, — 

14 Grindle Cretk, 

15 Kehukee, — 

16 Lawrence's M. H. 

17 Little Alligator,— 

18 Mafilc Spring,] 

19 Mattamuskeet, — 

20 Mearn's Chafiel,— 

21 Morattock, — 

22 North Creek, 

23 Old Ford,— 

24 Peach Tree, 

25 Picot M.H.— 

26 Pungo, — 

27 Quankey ,]— 

28 Red Bud,]— 

29 itody Creek,]— 

30 2?ock?/ Swamp,]- 

31 Sandy Creek,]— 

32 Scuppernong, — 

33 Sapponcy, 

34 Skewarkey, 

35 Smithwick's Cr.— 

36 Spring Green, — 

37 Sowrcd Side,— 

38 Tarborough, — 

39 Tranter's Creek, 

40 Washington, — 

41 WJWte Plains, 

42 Williams' M. II- 



MINISTERS 8c DELEGATES. 



James Harrison, Daniel Biggs, 
John Phiilpot, Thomas Robason, 
John Bryan, James Mayo, 
William Thigpen, James Jones, 
MICAJAH AMBROSE, 
WM. HYMAN, Wm. R. Long, 
Thomas Goodwin, Jesse Powell,* 
Jesse Battle, James S. Battle, 
Willie Powell, 
LUKE WARD, Wm. Clements, 16 
John Richardson,* 1 
James Potter, Malachi Linton, 1 
Jesse Moore, John S. Brown, 9 
WM. CLARK, Benj. F. Eborn, 29 
John Shield, Turner Brewer, 10 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Wm 

Dicken, - - 

Joseph Evans, - - 



g ! H f » 

s e 



1 4 



Albin B. Swindle, H. H. Fodery, 
W T illie Buntin,. Nath. Harrison,* 
Joseph Bateman, Lovick Sexton, 
LEMUEL ROSS, Euel Abel, 
John Hodges, James Hodges, 
WM. B. WORRELL, Gid. Bass* 
Joshua Robason, Joseph Robason, 
John R. Davis, Samuel Clark, 



Robert Bertie,* 
Matthew Joiner, Isaac Vick, 
Thomas Biggs, John Ward, 
John Perry, Humphrey Stallings 
Lewelling Bowers, William Gray, 
Caleb Woodard, Zebulon Kemp, 
Peter P. Lawrence, Bart. Bowers 
Marshall Wilson,* Daniel Leggitt, 
Arnet Latham, Levin Wallace, 
Asa Odin, John Latham, 
David Bradley, 



12 



34 



1 

8i 3 
l| 1 

J 3 



3 
2 28 



2! 2 



Total, 19812566 



D. C. 



30 
51 
57 
21 
59 
46 
60 
85 
79 
85 
27 
30 
97 
106 
142 

66 
24 

85 

47 

93 

64 

30' 

48 

55 

22 

25 

31 

25 

66 

15 

33 

30 

75 

36 

43 

36 

61 

34 

48 

24 

61 



50 
00 
00 
CO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 



1 50 
1 00 



2 15 

1 00 

2 00 
2 15 
1 00 

50 
1 00 
1 00 



80 

1 00 

2 00 
1 00 
1 00 

75 
1 00 
1 00 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 



46 5017 2150 45 85 



Mote. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CAPI- 
TALS; unordained Ministers in italics; those marked thus, * were not present; from 
Churches marked thus, ] we received no intelligence, in that case their number stands 

as last vear; dashes denote no Pastors; the last column shews the monthly stated 

meetings of the Churches; the column before, the contributions from the Churches to 
tkc Association fund. 



n 

5. A Petitionary letter from a Church constituted in July last, aj, 
the Baregrass Meeting-house, Martin county, praying admission 
into this body, was handed in by their messengers, and read; up- 
on satisfactory information, they were received, and the same 
was manifested, by the Moderator giving their messengers the 
right hand of fellowship, as a member of this Association. 

6. Letters of correspondence from sister Associations were 
called for, when one was handed in from the Neuse Association, 
by their messengers Elders Thomas Dupree and Benjamin By- 
num. Another from the Chowan Association, by their messen- 
gers Elders James Ross, James Wright, and Reuben Law- 
rence, (Elder Lawrence only one present.) Another from the 
Raleigh Association, by their messenger P. W. Down; the afore- 
said letters were read, and the delegates took seats with us. 

7. On motion, agreed, that we open a correspondence with the 
Raleigh Conference; and Eider Joshua Lawrence is requested 
to write a letter, and be the bearer thereof to said Conference. 
Also, agreed, that we open a correspondence with the Nauhaunty 
Association, and Elder William Hyman is requested to write a, 
letter to that Association, and be the bearer thereof. 

8. The following Committees were appointed, (viz:) Elders 
Joshua Lawrence, William Hyman, and William Clark, to 
draft a fair resolution, and the decision of this Association at its 
session in the year 1827, relative to sundry articles then before 
the Association, and which stands in the Minutes of that year the. 
14th article. Elders Thomas Dupree, William B. Worrell, 
and William Clark, to examine the Circular Letter. Brethren 
Thomas Biggs and Thomas Godwin, on Finance. Elder Wil- 
liam Clark, to write a letter of correspondence to the Neuse 
Association. The above committees to report on Monday next. 

9. Elders Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Dupree, and William 
B. Worrell, are requested, (by private ballot,) to occupy the 
stage, by preaching on the morrow; divine worship to commence 
at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Association then adjourned, until Monday morning, 9 o'- 
clock, with prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

SUNDAY, October 4th, 1829. 
Elder William B. Worrell opened the services of the day, 
and preached from Ephesians v. chap. Island 2d verses: "Be ye 
therefore followers of God, as dear children, and walk in love, as 
Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offer- 
ing and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling savour." Elder 
Thomas Dupree followed, and preached from the Epistle of 
Jude, and 3d verse: "Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write 
unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write 
unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the 
faith which was once delivered unto the saints." Elder Joshua 
Lawrence preached, (and closed the exercises of the day,) from 
x. chap, and 35th verse of Hebrews: "Cast not away therefore 
your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward. " Froni 
the faithfulness of the ministers in declaring the word, and the 



attention of the congregation, we hope the labors of the day will 
hot be in vain. 

MONDAY MORNING, 5th Oct. 1829. 
, The Association being convened, and opened with prayer, by 
Elder William Hyman, proceeded to business. 

10. After, calling over the messengers' names, entitled to seats 
in this body, from their respective churches, and noting thos*; 
that were absent, the committees appointed on Saturday last, were 
called on to report; when Elder William Clark, handed in a 
letter, to the Neuse Association, which Was read and received^ 
and Elders Lemuel Ross and William Clark appointed bear 
ers thereof. Elder Joshua Lawrence handed in a letter to the 
Raleigh Conference, which was read and received. Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman reported that he had failed to write to the Nau 
haunty Association; and this Association agreed that he should 
write a letter, under the signature of the Moderator and Clerk, 
which he was appointed on Saturday last, to bear to them. The 
committee appointed on Saturday, to draft a Resolution and deei- 
sion of this body in the year 1827, reported: That they view with 
regret, the incorrect inferences which have been drawn, from the 
decision of this body at their session of 1827; which have arisen in 
part, from the misrepresentation of those who were affected by 
that decision; arising from the conviction that it would ultimate 
in the prostration, of their fondest hopes of personal aggrandize- 
ment. And we are sorry to perceive in the words of the deci- 
sion, that it affords them even the semblance of justification. We 
do deeply regret the influence, which we perceive it has had, up- 
on our sister Associations. We do not, we cannot, nor we will 
not, recede from those measures, in which we believe are invol- 
ved the glory of God, the happiness and prosperity of this Asso- 
ciation, and the destiny of unborn millions: We however owe it 
to ourselves, to make such explanations, as will present to our 
brethren, in clear and unambiguous terms, the attitude which this 
Association has assumed, and which by the help of God she will 
sustain: — 

We disclaim any right, and consequently any intention, of 
meddling either directly or indirectly, with the internal govern- 
ment of any Association but our own. We do not assume to 
ourselves the right of saying, that any member, without the 
bounds of our Association, shall, or shall not, do any act; they are 
accountable to their respective Associations, or churches, and not 
to us. But we do claim a right, in the boundary of this Associa- 
tion, to prescribe under the authority of the churches, such rules 
and regulations, as are indispensably necessary, to promote what 
We think will be for the peace and harmony of the churches, with- 
in our bounds, and to discountenance such practices amongst us, as 
is calculated to interrupt our harmony. Therefore, your commit- 
tee do recommend, the adoption of the following resolution and 
explanation : 

First, We will not hold in our churches, any member who is in the 
practice of visiting the Masonic Lodges; or who on any occasion, con- 
forms to their custom of parades. Nor .will we countenance any ir 



individual, who may reside or come among us in the character of & 
Preacher. 

Secondly, We will not countenance any preacher, who travels within 
the bounds of our Association, establishing Societies for the collection 
of money, or who may himself be collecting money, to support any in- 
stitution whatever. 
We do not attempt to circumscribe the liberty of conscience; eve- 
ry person has a right to think, and draw their own conclusions 
We do not attempt to suppress the liberty of speech; every indivi- 
dual has a right to speak or express the convictions of their own 
mind. We do not attempt to restrain the liberty of any man; he 
may give his money where, and to whom he pleases. We do not 
object to the spread of the Bible, by all fair and honorable means e 
but pray for its extension by means which God may bless and 
own. s We do not object to. the support of the ministry, on the 
gospel plan; but earnestly recommend it to the direct and imme- 
diate attention of all the deacons in this Association; whose busi- 
ness God has made it, to see to this matter, as well as all the m o 
nied concerns of the Christian community. We do not object to 
the general diffusion of intelligence and literature, in the Baptist 
community; but wish its extension. But we do object to the edu- 
cation of men to the ministry, by the establishing of seminaries 
for that purpose; believing thaj preaching would thereby become 
a lucrative employment, like the law, physic, &c. If any minis- 
ter, although he rn,ay be a missionary, without the bounds of our 
Association, comes amongst us to preach the gospel, and not to 
make collections, we do not reject him. 

The above report being read twice, was received, and ordered! 
lo be spread on these Minutes. 

The committee of Finance reported, that they find in the 
hands of the Treasurer, at the close of last Association, the 
sum of - - - - - $49 97§ 

Received in contributions from the churches at this As- 
sociation, - - - - - 45 85 



Making, $95 82| 
Paid KIder Joseph Biggs, for preparing the Mi n- • 
utes of last year for the press, superintending the 
printing, recording one copy on our records, and 
distributing the Minufes as usual, - $10 00 

Paying the printer, for striking 500 copies, 30 00 

Total expense, -40 00 

Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $55 82% 

rue Association concurred with the report. 

The committee appointed lo examine the Circular Letter, re- 
ported^ that they approbated the Letter, and now surrender the 
same to the Association; which was read, received, and ordered 
to be attached to these Minutes. 

11. Resolved, that we send 25 copies of our Minutes, to both 
.the Raleigh and Chowan Associations. 

12. Resolved, that our next Association be held at Morattock 
^citing-house/ Washington county, to commence Saturday before 



• 6 

the first Sunday in October, 1830, at 11 o'clock, A. M. Elder 
Joshua Lawrence is requested to deliver an introductory ser- 
mon to that Association, and in case of his failure, Elder Wm. 
Hyjian is requested to do the same. 

13. Elder Wm. Hyman is requested to write a Circular Let- 
ter for our next Association. 

14. Elder Joseph Biggs is requested to transcribe and prepare 
these Minutes for the press, superintend the printing, and have 
600 copies struck, and distribute them as usual; and record one 
copy of these Minutes on our Record. 

The Association then adjourned to the time and place appoint? 
ed, with prayer by Elder Dupree. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
BENJ. F. EBORN, Clerk. 

Circular JLztttx* 

Dearly beloveij Brethren: You will no doubt expect to 
see a Circular attached to our Minutes this year, as it has been so 
customary heretofore; but as so many important subjects have 
been touched upon in this way, we hardly know which way to 
steer our course for your greatest advantage; but not recollecting 
that we ever have addressed you in our former epistles, on the 
all-important subject of the divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ, we 
shall venture to call your attention at this time, to that necessary 
part of the Christian faith, and chief requisite in the grand scheme 
of redemption, and main pillar of the Christian hope, in order to 
his eternal salvation, through our Lord Jesus Christ, as laid down 
in the volume of inspiration, by the unerring Holy Ghost, upon 
Prophets, Christ and his Apostles. For, dear brethren, while you 
are sojourning in this world of tribulation, y9u must expect, and 
will be assailed by adversaries of every kin*d: Therefore, Paul ad- 
vised the brethren in his day, to take the whole armor of God. 
And the faith of this may be called the master-piece, the chief 
corner stone; the main, the sure foundation; the chief qualification 
of Jesus Christ, to effectuate and accomplish the great work of 
our redemption, and eternal glorification. And if this foundation 
of the Christian faith be removed, what shall the righteous do, for 
an object of faith? For Jesus himself, saith to his disciples: "Ye 
believe in God; believe also in me." And what does Jesus mean, by 
believing also in me? But to believe also, that he was God, as well 
as the Father. For the disciples could not help believing their 
own eyes and ears, that he was man. And again, when contend- 
ing with the Jews, about his sonship, or equality with God, he 
said: "Except ye believe I am he, you shall die in your sins. " I 
am, is one of the names God gave himself, for Moses to carry to 
Pharaoh. And this Lord Jesus is the same I am, or God, that 
appeared to Moses in the bush; and done those mighty wonders, 
in the land of Egypt; and that was with the church, in the wilder- 
ness. And therefore, without believing Jesus Christ is I am, or. 



7 

God, you shall die in your sins, as well as the Jews. This then* 
dear brethren, is the most essential part of the Christian faith. 
And he is anti-Christ that denies it: For the Jews did not deny, 
nor could not help believing, he was man. But to believe he was 
the Son of God, or God, or equal with God, they would not ad- 
mit; even after seeing all his miracles. Nor would the High 
Priest, on his trial, call this claim to sonship with God, any thing 
else but blasphemy. And the Jews, in argument with the Sa- 
viour, on that subject, said: "he blasphemeth, because being a 
man, he maketh himself God." And yet. what fair reasoning 
Jesus offers them for convincement, saying: "If I do not the 
works of my Father, believe me not;" that is, if I do not the 
works of a God, believe me not; or that my claim is rightly foun- 
ded; but if I do, "believe me, for the very works' sake;" that is, 
that I am God, because I do the works of a God. But it is agreed 
by men, and devils, that there is one God, (except by atheists, if 
such men there be,) though we doubt it, whether God has left, 
any reasonable soul, without a consciousness of his divine exist- 
ence. For the very heathen have it, whatever atheists may sav- 
in a bravado, or to leUout the wickedness and wishes of their 
hearts, that there is no God. For the invisible things of God„ 
are clearly seen in the works of creation he has so lavishly scat- 
tered around us, as for the reasonable soul of man to read, in in- 
telligible lines, the eternal power, wisdom, goodness, mercy, and 
providence of this invisible Godhead: which no man hath seen ? 
nor can see, while in this mortal flesh. Yet in his works of crea- 
tion, his eternal power and goodness is seen every where, within 
and without us, above and below us, we see the work of his fin- 
gers in power and skill abundantly displayed. And where, in all 
the large volume of creation, will you, or can you brethren, find 
the image, the footsteps, the works of the fingers of the son of 
God, or attain to a knowledge of him, by any or all the works of 
creation? No, the greatness, the freeness of his love, his bloody- 
suffering, and agonizing death for your salvation, is not to be 
found, or read, in any work of creation. Hence it is said, the 
world by wisdom, knew not God. For although creation re- 
veals, in intelligible lines, a God, yet creation does not reveal, 
three persons in that God-head. And hence a knowledge of God ? 
cannot be found by all the works of creation. Hence the need of 
revelation, by inspiration, to reveal this one God, as he is, in three 
persons. Then it is alone by the Holy Scriptures, or by the in- 
spiration of the Holy Ghost, that we can come to the knowledge 
of Jesus Christ, or the three persons in this one God-head. Hence 
here reason must stand shrouded in darkness, while the Holy 
Scriptures, reveals as with a sun-beam, the Lord Jesus Christ, as 
the second person in this eternal God-head. And that this one ? 
eternal God, t^t created the world, has revealed himself in the 
Holy Scriptures, as subsisting in three persons. If it is not to be 
found out, by reason in the works of creation, here in the Scrip- 
lures, it doth plainly appear. And first, in the works of creation 
it is shewn: "Come let us make man;" us, is a plurality of persons 
in the God-head. Again, in the gospel of John: "In the begin- 



§ 

uing was the word; and the word was with God." And don'i 
let your minds be thinking, Jesus is inferior to the Father, fo; 
fi the word was God." And on the day of Jesus' baptists, U was 
proven; the Father speaking from heaven; Christ walking from 
Jordan; the Holy Ghost descendingon him as a dove. And again, 
the commission to his apostles* prove three persons; baptizing 
;hem in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost. And why three names, if not three persons? For would 
it not have been vain and wrong, to have baptised in the name of 
three persons, if three did not really exist? And not as some 

' vainly suppose, that it is three names, or threj offices for the same 
person, or one God. But are we not taught, by the three distinct 
names, three persons, and three equals? Surely, as the first epis- 
tle of John says, v. chap. 7th verse: "For there are three, that 
bare record in heaven; the Father, the Word, and the Holy 
Ghost," and these three are one. Nothing is more plain, than that 
there is, in this one God, three persons; equal in hearing record- 
Although the mystery is so deep, we can't s6und it; yet that is no 
objection rightly founded, of i-he certainty of this truth; because 
we can't solve to our reason, or satisfaction, such a mode of exist- 
ence; or because it is an existence, we are unacquainted with; and 
have not seen how unity can dwell in trinity, and trinity in unity. 
What else could we expect, in God's revealing himself, but in- 
conceivable mysteries? When there are so many thousands, in* 
his works, we can't scan, with our shallow apprehensions. But 
from scripture it is as plain as a, b, c, that there is one God, and 
three persons in that God-head ; equal in essence. For we hay? 
three distinct names, at the same time; and surely the Holy Ghost 
intended three names for three persons, or else language means 
nothing. For we are thus taught to distinguish them, by name 
of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; and throughout the oid and new 
testaments the Holy Ghost teaches us, by different names to un- 
derstand different persons, performing different works; and not the 
same person, doing three kinds of different work; and in a num^ 
her of places, in holy writ, we are taught, three are one, and thi$ 
one three; and points out the work of all three; and not three, 
kinds of work for one: Yet concentrate these three, in the work 
of creation, redemption, and regeneration; as all united in one, 

*doing the same work: Nor can we tell what proportionable part, 
Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost, have in the work of creation, 
,&c. Nor what hand, as persons, the Father, an I Holy Ghost, had 
in the great work of redemption; or that Christ, and the Father, 
have, as persons, in the trinity, in regeneration:; for the world is 
said to be made by Christ; and in the work of redemption, Christ 
saith, "the Father that dwelielh in me, he doth -he work." But 
we are admonished not U> pursue, for it is plain from scripture, 
that there are three persons in the God head ; nor qpn we see any 
sense in words, nor in the plan of redemption, withcu three per- 
sons in the trinity; and Jesus Christ, one of them persons, equal- 
ly, or by what other name you please to call him, Son of Gcd, or 
God Saviour, or what not. We next proceed to prove, that this 
U L'ond person in the trinity, called Jesus Christ, is God. In the 



9 

first epistle of John, he is called the word; in Revelation, he has 
his name the word of God. Paul said to Timothy, "Preach the 
word;''* which was, to preach Jesus Christ: and in the first chap- 
ter of the gospel by John, he is called, "the word with God;" 
and then says, "the word was God." All put together shews 
plainly, Jesus Christ is God. And the Father says of the Son, 
by the Holy Ghost, by David, and rehearsed to the Hebrews, by 
Paul, "Thy throne, Oh God, is forever and ever." And again, 
says Paul, "though in the form of a servant, he thought it not 
robbery to be equal with God." And again, "feed the flock of 
God, which he hath purchased, with his own blood." And in 
Isaiah, he is called, "the mighty God, everlasting Father." We 
are forbid to cite, the great abundance of scriptures, by which it 
might be proved, that Jesus Christ is God; plainly expressed, and 
in abundance more plainly implied. 

We next proceed to prove, he is both God and man. And the 
one in Isaiah shews both; for in that text, he is seen by the Pro^ 
phet, in his proper colors: "To us a child is born, to us a son is 
given, his name the mighty God, everlasting Father;" and his be- 
ing the son of God, "Prince of Peace." And again, "the chil- 
dren being partakers of flesh and blood, he likewise took part of 
the same." And the he, that took, could not be the. same that 
was taken, hence then, he is God; the flesh taken, the man. And 
again, "He took not on him, the nature of angels, but the seed of 
Abraham." Here is both God and man,. in the text. Again, the 
divinity of Christ, addressing the person of the Father, by the 
mouth of the Prophet, personating the person of Christ: "Burnt 
offerings, thou wouldst not, but a body, hast thou prepared me;" 
which shews the necessity of a body, for the divinity to come in: 
"Lo, I come, &c." Hence Christ is God and man. And again: 
"God manifest in the flesh." And again: "the word was made 
flesh, and dwelt among us." And this is Paul's great mystery, 
that needs no controversy; because it can be proved, by the whole 
scope of revelation, that Jesus Christ is both God and man; and is 
equal with the Father, God's fellow; and that his being man, did 
not lessen his equality; "and that God was in Christ, reconciling 
the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them," 
but unto that body, he had prepared, for the divinity of Christ to 
inhabit, to effectuate the great, the grand, the glorious, and gra- 
cious work, of our eternal redemption; by that body called Jesus 
Christ, with God in it. We dare not pursue, for there is line 
upon line, in the bible, to prove Jesus Christ was God and man. 

Now, thirdly, we proceed to prove, that there is no other God 
in heaven or earth, but Jesus Christ; and that he is this one, three, 
God. Perhaps, brethren, you are ready to stare, if you have not 
studied this subject from the scriptures; because it is to be feared, 
your fancies have oflimes painted in your view, three Gods. But 
no where in the scripture, where the true God is spoken of, is he 
called Gods in the plural. But when the Father, the Son, or the 
Holy Ghost is spoken of as God, each is called God, and the 
Whole Trinity is equally called God in the singular; so these 
£hree are one God, and that one God is Jesus Christ. So mark 



iO 

vvelj, what follows. The first we offer, is in Isaiah, 45th chap, 
and 22d verse: "Look unto me, and be ye saved all ye ends of 
the earth, for I am God, and there is none else." Is not Jesus 
Christ set forth in the scripture, as the only Saviour of men, and 
no other name given? Then he is God, and none else, nor is 
there any God beside him. The second, we offer: "The Father 
that dwellelh in me, he doeth the work." Then it follows that 
Christ has no distinct divinity from the Father; but the divinity 
of both, is the same in the body of Christ, doing the work. And 
all say the Father is God; then if the Father was in him, he was 
God, and not Gods; and take this text to help you: Colossians, 
4< the fulness of the Godhead dwelleth in him bodily;" or in his 
body; and here is another God, was in Christ, and another God, 
manifest in the flesh. And another, "I in the Father, and the 
Father in me;" and now let's put on the cap-stone: "Shew us the 
Father," (saith Philip,) "Have I been so long time with you, 
Philip, and hast thou not known me? He that hath seen me, hath 
seen the Father; for I and the Father are one." Yes, that one 
mysterious God, in three persons, is Jesus Christ; and none be- 
sides, in heaven or earth, the first and the last, the beginning and 
the end, by whom all things were created, and made. "And 
without him, there was nothing made, which was made." This 
God was the God of Abel, known by faith of his bloody suffer- 
ings; this God was the God of Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, 
known by their bloody sacrifices; this God was the God of Mo- 
ses, known by the like unto him; this God was the God of Israeli 
and of Shadrach, Meshach and Abed-nego, known by his like- 
ness of the son of man, walking in the fiery furnace. This is the 
Christian's God, and has been in all ages; and they never knew 
any other, in any age of the world, but God, in Christ revealed, 
reconciled, by the blood of the man. "not imputing their tres- 
passes, to them," but unto that man, in union with God; through 
which God reveals himself a God of love and peace to their souls, 
through this man, Christ Jesus, this God. dear brethren, we 
hope he is our God, and we hope you can say, this is your God; 
and he will be our upmaking portion, and guide, even unto death; 
and to the quiet enjoyment of that kingdom, he has prepared for 
you, in the mansions of God on high. And dearly beloved bre- 
thren in the Lord, is not this enough to strengthen your faith, in 
the Saviour, Jesus Christ: to trust and commit your soul to his 
hands, believing like Paul, "He is able to keep it, against that 
day;" when he shall come to take his ransomed home, to shew 
them his glory in heaven, beyond all thought, or expression, to 
the everlasting j.oy of your souls; and to be admired, as the only 
one, three, God, forever and ever, by those that believe. 

Now it is well known to you, dear brethren, by your own ex- 
perience, from your conversion to God, until now, you have been 
growing in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ; whom to 
know, as God, is life eternal: And that in this advancement of 
your knowledge of Jesus Christ, your christian happiness, and 
strength of spiritual life, have been renewed from time to time. 
And if you could now, comprehend this mystery, God, Christ 



it 

subsisting in three persons fully; tell us when your future happi - 
ness would exist: But, oh eternity! will not be sufficient for your 

f growth, and advancement to high degrees of knowledge, in this 
mystery? Then grow in grace, and in the knowledge of Christ 
Jesus, our Lord; and the more you thus advance, the more will be 

£ your peace; the more it will assimilate you, into his divine like- 
ness: Thus through eternity, we shall be advancing to higher de- 
grees of the knowledge of God, in which every Christian knows 
His happiness consists; and by which, beholding of God, in the 
face of Jesus Christ, he is changed into the same image; but the" 
unfathomable depths, of this great mystery, God in Christ, and his 
eternal excellency, opens an unbounded field, for us to explore; a 
Held with new and sweet d'eliglits of joy, glory, and bliss, upon 
which even angels have not yet entered: And instead of unity, 
and trinity, being against the Christian religion, because it is so 
incomprehensible, and unfathomable, by the most capacious souls; 
this inconceivable rnyster} 7 affords a constant, new field of medi- 
tation, to saints of all ranks, in heaven, and earth; for even an- 
gels, with astonishment, joy, wonder and praise, in attempting to 
sound, with the line of their highest conceptions, the depths of 
this mystery of love, break forth in songs of "glory to God, in the 
Jiighest, peace on earth, good will toward man," and desire to look 
into this mystery, God in flesh; the best of all mysteries for men: 
A mystery that must be believed, or die in our sins: A mystery 
that must be revealed, by the Holy Ghost, or none can say with 
an evidence, "Jesus Christ is Lord," or the true and living Godz 
A mystery, a great mystery, that none can scan, until the spirit 
makes it plain, how Jesus Christ is God, and still is man. A 
mystery revealed from faith to faith, received by faith, and not 
reason, or sense. A soul-sweetening mystery, for though Jesus 
Christ is man, and died upon the tree, yet still he is the God, the 
unit, and the three; he is the blessed Virgin's son, that whispers 
peace to me. It is from this mystery, our peace doth flow, for in 
this world we have none; then we must believe this mystery, or 
we shall be eternally undone. A mystery, dear brethren, which 
the devil is making a stumbling stone of, in this day to thousands, 
as well as in ages past; how Jesus Christ can be God. And 
therefore, dear brethren, stand fast by faith, in the word of God, 
as revealed in the scriptures; and walk by faith, of this great 
truth, and not by sight, or reason. For if you give up this, you 
die in your sins, and make the gospel a mere fable; for suppose 
Jesus Christ be only a man, or a creature endowed with the 
greatest capacities God ever made, in heaven or earth, whai 
Would this faith avail you? for is not every creature, God has 
made, endowed with capacities to serve him, bound to do so, to 
the highest extent of their capacities; and when they have done 
so, they have only done their duty to God, for which they were 
made and endowed. And so, if Jesus Christ, is only man, he 
has only done his duty, and where is merit for you? You might 
as well believe in an angel for salvation. Then it follows, that 
those that deny Jesus Christ being God, destroy the efficacy of 
the whole gospel system; and each man must go to heaven, (if he. 



42 

^ets there at ail,) on his own merit: And we ask, where is ths 
merit of children, idiots, the thief on the cross, and such sinners 
as you, or the chief of sinners? For all such, there is no hope, 
by their own merits; then cry out, Christ is dead in vain, if he be 
not God. And can you not see plainly, that he that denieth Je- 
sus Christ is God, is Anti-Christ; for, whoever denied that Christ 
is man? not even infidels, or Pharisees, his worst enemies. So 
then, when you hear supported by preaching, or otherwise, that 
Jesus Christ is not God, say like Peter, "damnable heresy, even 
denying the Lord that bought them," or with John, that "he is 
Anti-Christ, thai denieth the Father, and the Son:" for, saith Je- 
sus, "He that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and I and my 
Father are one." So Unitarianism, is the doctrine of Anti- 
Christ; and all its scriptural reasonings, the plumes of Satan, tp 
deceive with damnable heresy, and trouble, and distract, the. 
church of God, as in ages past: therefore beware, brethren, lest 
you should be led away, from plain scriptural truth? by the error 
of the false reasoning of wicked men; but rather credit, and main- 
tain God's word, and stick to that, as the only lamp, to guide you 
aright in this truth, here in this dark world. For if you let go 
this, you will soon be sunk, into the whirlpool of reasoning, on 
this mystery, and be drowned in the depths of speculative false- 
hoods. Then stand fast by faith, and believe it, because God has 
so revealed it. For if Jesus Christ is not God, where is the 
atonement? (for the mere creature could make none.) And he 
that denies that Jesus Christ is God, give the prophets, Christ, 
and the apostles, the lie. For it is a plain express truth from 
scripture, and all metaphysical reasoning can't make it otherwise. 
Nor are you to understand, brethren, that God was in Christ, by 
an impartation of his spiritual influence, as upon the prophets and. 
apostles, to prepare them to work miracles, &c: or that he was in 
Christ, in a greater degree, for this would not make Christ God 9 
no more than it made the prophets and apostles Gods, by God's 
spirit dwelling in them. But in a different way: hence it is ex- 
pressed in a different way, "the fulness of the Godhead, dwelt in 
him bodily;" this is not said, of any prophets, or apostles. Again* 
"God was in Christ. 5 ' And again, "All power in heaven and 
earth, is given into my hands." And again, "The son of man 
has power on earth, to forgive sins." And who has power to for* 
give sins, but God? And again, "He hath the keys of hell, and 
of death; shuts and no man opens." Hence he is the living God; 
not by practical influence, but really so, in essence, fulness of 
grace, and glory; and none beside, save this God, in Christ. And 
if Jesus is not God, the angels are mistaken, and guilty of rigjht 
down idolatry; for they ascribe to him, that glory and praise, that 
is only due to a God: And if Jesus Christ is not God. God has 
robbed himself of the homage of his creatures, for "when he 
bringeth the first begotten into the world, he saith, let all the an- 
gels°of God worship him." And again, "He hath givenliim a 
name, above every name, that at the name of Jesus Christ, every 
knee should bow, in heaven and earth." And the clause does not 
except God himself, for every knee is mentioned; so Christ h 



p 

Worthy of the worship of all creatures, in God's esteem; and so 
he must be God, for what name is above every name, but the 
name God. But we are admonished, on this head, and will say, 
brethren, that this doctrine is set forth in the scriptures, more full, 
and plain, that Jesus Christ is God, than you have been (perhaps) 
aware of. Jn a great many places plainly expressed, and in an 
abundance, plainly implied. And it had need be so, as it is the 
very quintessence of the gospel system, upon which the salvation 
of the world is suspended. But perhaps some are ready to say, 
if the Father be God, and the Son be God, and the Holy Ghost 
be God, then there are three Gods. JJo, dear brethren, thisj s is 
the unfathomable mystery; how Christ is the Father, and the "Fa- 
ther, Christ; as he says: "He that hath seen me, hath seen the 
Father," or that he and the Father were not two Gods; but as he 
says, "I and my Father are one:" or we should say, he meant one 
and the same God, though two persons; and so the Father, the 
Son, and the Holy Ghost, are but one God; as John saith, yet 
three; then how these three are one, and this one three, is left for 
faith to believe, and eternity to unravel: When faith shall be 
turned into sight, and hope into full possession; for we do not 
pretend to fathom this depth of infinity, but receive it, because we 
•know it by revelation in part, being revealed by the Holy Ghost, 
that searches the deep things of God; and bears this record, in 
prophets, Christ, and apostles, in God's most holy word, as mat- 
ter of faith, and not shallow reason. And none but enlightened 
angels, and men inspired or enlightened by the Holy Ghost, can 
join in the sacred song of universal harmony in heaven, and earth, 
and cry from heartfelt joy, "worthy is the Lamb, that was slain, to 
receive blessing, honor, riches, praise, power, majesty, and do- 
minion, forever and forever: 5 ' because they are enlightened, by 
the Holy Ghost, to see him, both Lord and Christ, or God and 
man. And may we not then say to you, brethren, as Jesus said 
to his disciples, "Blessed are the eyes, that see the things that 
you see;" or as he said to Peter, "Blessed art thou, Simon Barjo- 
na, for flesh and blood hath not revealed this unto you; but my 
Father which is in heaven:" or as Paul said, "No man can say 
that Jesus Christ is Lord, but by the Holy Ghost." then, dear- 
ly beloved brethren, what a high calling of God is yours; thus to 
he shewn a way to the mansion-house of your Father in heaven. 
While he has hid these things from the wise and prudent, of this 
world, yet has revealed it to you, though babes, in Christ, to ena- 
ble you to trust your souls in his hands, as the way, the truths 
and the life, that leads to the Father's right hand; and beget in 
you, a principle of love, and desire, to maintain good works, to 
the glory of God, and the honor of the gospel of God; and thus by 
faith, and good works, fit you for heaven, by the operation of his 
spirit upon you; and at length take you within doors, of the house 
not made with hands, eternal in the heavens; to see his unveiled 
glory, as the mighty God, and everlasting Father of your souls; 
by creation, redemption, and regeneration; to the quiet enjoy- 
ment of your eternal inheritance. Wherefore, dear brethren, see- 
ing you believe such things, hope such things, and look for such 
% •%-> l M 4^"' V|! Lr 4 . "'jjjjS^^f^ • ■ 



14 

things, strive to make your calling and election sure; by fighting 
the good fight of faith, running and wrestling against flesh and 
blood, for the prize; that you may overcome, as did Christ, and 
set down with him, in his throne, and "grow not weary in well 
doing, neither faint in your minds, at the troubles of the way;" 
nor be slothful, in the latter part of the journey of life; but be up 
and a doing; urge on, your cold, backward, and dull hearts; know- 
ing that he that would have limbs, must use limbs: so he that 
would have the comforts, and life of religion, must use the duties 
of religion: so let your lamps, brethren, be burning, and shining 
In good works, to the glory of £rod>and your souls comfort. 



Free Press — Tarboro' N. C. 



/ 

m 



MINUTES 



OP THE 



Kehukee Baptist Association, 

H OLDEN AT 



MORATTOCB MEETING-HOUSE, 

Washington County, JV. C. 
The 2d, 3d, and 4th of October, 1830, 



SATURDAY, October 2, 1830. 

1. The Introductory Sermon was delivered by Elder William Hyman, 
(who was appointed in case of failure of Elder Joshua Lawrence,) from 
Acts ii. chap, and 42d verse: "And they continued stedfastly in the Apos- 
tle's doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers. " 
Prayer by Elder Joshua Lawrence. 

2. The Association then convened, and being opened with prayer by 
Elder Joseph Biggs, proceeded to choose Elder William Hyman, Mo* 
derator; Elder Joseph Biggs, Clerk; and Brother Joseph D. Biggs, Assist- 
ant Clerk. 

3. Letters from thirty-two churches were handed in and read, the mes- 
sengers names enrolled, took the following account from the churches, as 
stated in the table of churches. 

4. A Petitionary letter from the church ,. T jat Coenjock, Currituck county j 
(formerly a member of Ihe Chowan Association,) praying admission into 
this body, was handed in by their messengers, and read; upon satisfactory 
information they ^vere received, and the same was manifested by the Mo- 
derator, giving their messengers the right hand of fellowship, as a member 
of this Association. 



2 



CHURCHES. 



1 Baregrass,— 

2 Blunt' s Creek, — 

3 Coenjock, 

4 Conoho,— 

5 Conetoe,— 

6 Concord, 

7 Cross Roads, 

8 Deep- Creek,— 

9 Falls Tar River 

10 Fishing Creek,] 

11 Flat Swamp, 

12 Frying Fan, — 

13 Goose Creek, 

14 Great Swamp,"- - 

15 Grindle Creek., 

16 Kehukee,— 

17 Lawrence's MIL 

18 Little Alligator, - 

19 Mattamuskeet, — 

20 Maple Spring,] 

21 Meatus' Chape I] 

22 Mar attack,— 

23 North Creek, 

24 Old Ford,— 

25 /VacA Tree,] 

26 Pico/ Mil,— 

27 Pungo, — 

28 Qz/a«kez/,f 

29 Red Bud,}— 

30 /tecfy Cr<?ek,f — 

31 Rocky Swamp, }- 

32 Sandy Creek,]— 

33 Sapponey,]— 

34 Scuppernong, — 

35 Skewarkey, 

36 S?nithwick's Cr.~ 

37 Sound Side, — 

38 Spring Green, — 

39 Tar borough,— 

40 Tranter's Creek, 

41 Washington, — 

42 WTsite Plains, 

43 Williams' M.PL-- 



MINISTERS 6c DELEGATES. 



Daniel Biggs, James Harrison, 
Joseph Tripp,* J. R. Phillpot, 
SAMUEL TATUM* Foster Jar- 
vis, Maximillian Fatum, 
Asa Jones, James Mayo, 
William Thigpen, John H.Daniel, 
MICAJAH AMBROSE,* Daniel 
Clifton, 

WM. HYM AN, Wm. R. Long, 
Joseph Whitehead,* 
Jesse Battle,* William Doitch,* 
PHILEMON BENNETT,* 
LUKE WARD, Edm. Andrews, 
John Richardson, 

GREEN CARRQWAN, Emery 

Saddler, 
Jesse Moore, Willis Fleming, 
WM. CLARK, Benj. F. Eborn, 
General Young, Perry Bazemore, 
JOSH. LAWRENCE, Jas.£iggs, 
Joseph 'Evans, 

Richard M. G. Moore, George M. 
Howard, 



Charles Blount, Lovick Sexton, 
LEM'L ROSS, Dan'i Wilkerson, 
David Singleton, Wm. Singleton, 
WILLIAM B. WORRELL, 
Joshua Robason, Joseph Robason, 
John R. Davis, Henry Davis, 



Joshua Spruill, Robert Bertie, 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Thomas Biggs, 
Micajah Perry, Humphrey Stal- 

lings, - - 
Zebulon Kemp, Gilb't Brickhouse, 
Lewelling Bowers, William Gray, 
Bart. Bowers, Cofield King, 
JEREMIAH LEGGITT,* Mer- 
cer Wilson, Blunt Leggitt, 
Levin Wallace, George Elliot, 
MILES EVERITT, J. Windley, 
David Bradley, Henry Turvathan, 

Total, 





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4277 



NOTE. Pastors of churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CA- 
PITALS; unordained ministers in italics, Those marked thus, * were not pre- 
sent; from churches marked thus, f we received no intelligence, in that case their 
number stands as last year. Dashes — denote no Pastors. The last column 
shews the contributions from the churches to the Association fund. 



I 3 

5. Letters of correspondence^ from sister Associations were called for, 
when the following were handea in, and read; (viz:) one from the Little 
River Association, by their messenger Elder Burrell Temple, with 35 
copies of their last Minutes. Another from the Nawhunty Association, 
by their messenger Elder Benjamin Bynum, with 30 copies of their Min- 
utes. A letter from James Osborne, (of Baltimore,) to this Association, 
was handed in and read; resolved that EId # er Joshua Lawrence, be re- 
quested to acknowledge in the name of this Association, the reception 
thereof, and that a copy thereof be attached to these Minutes. 

6. The following committees were appointed, (viz:) Elder William 
Hyman, to write a letter of correspondence to the Little River Associa- 
tion; Elder Luke Ward, to write to the Nawhunty Association; Elders, 
William Hyman, Joshua Lawrence, Luke Ward, and Green Car- 
rowan, to examine the Circular Letter; Brethren, James Biggs, and Tho- 
mas Biggs, on finance; the above committees to report on Monday next. 

7. Resolved, that the ne?t Association be holden at Flat Swamp Meet- 
ing-House, Pitt county, N. C. to commence on Saturday before the fi?st 
Sunday in October, 1831, at 11 o'clock, A. M. Elder Green Carrowan 
is requested to deliver an Introductory Sermon to that Association, and in 
case of his failure, Elder W t illiam B. Worrell, is requested to do the 
same. Elder Joseph Biggs, is requested to write a Circular Letter for 
our next Association. 

8. Elders Burrell Temple and Joshua Lawrence, are requested, 
(by private ballot,) to occupy the stage, by preaching on the morrow: di- 
vine service to commence at 11 o'clock, A. M. The Association then ad- 
journed, until Monday morning, 9 o'clock, with prayer by Elder Joshua 
Lawrence. 

SUNDAY, October 3d, 1830. 
The brethren appointed to occupy the stage this day attended, and pro- 
ceeded in the following manner: Elder Burrell Temple opened the ser- 
vices of the day, and preached from Ezekiel xxxvii. chap. 3d and 4th ver- 
ses: "And he said unto me, son of man, can these bones live? And I an- 
swered, Lord God, thou knowest. Again he said unto me, prophecy 
upon these bones, and say unto them, ye dry bones, hear the word of 
the Lord." Elder Joshua Lawrence followed, and preached from Ro- 
mans xvi. chap. 17th and 18 th' verses: "Now I beseech you, brethren, 
mark them which cause divisions and otfences, contrary to the doctrine 
which ye have learned, and avoid them. For they that are such serve not 
our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly, and by good words and fair 
speeches deceive the hearts of the simple." Elder William Hyman clo- 
sed by prayer. 

MONDAY MORNING, October 4th, 1S30. 
The Association being assembled agreeably to adjournment, was opened 
with prayer by Elder Green Carrowan, and proceeded to business. 
The Assistant Clerk being absent, Brother Benjamin F. Eboi'n, was called 
on to supply his place. 

9. The committees appointed on Saturday were called on to report; 
when the one appointed to write to the Little River Association, handed 
in a letter which was read, and received, and Brethren William Hyman, 
and John H. Daniel appointed messengers. Another to the Nawhunty As- 
sociation was handed in, read and approved; and Elders Luke Ward, and 
William Dicken appointed messengers. The committee appointed to ex- 



4 

amine the Circular Letter," handed it in; the same was read and received, 
and ordered to be attached to these Minutes. 

The Committee of Finance reported, that there was in the hands of the 

Treasurer, at the close of last Association, the sum of $55 
Received in contributions from the Churches, at this Association, - 42 77 



Making, $98 59 

Paid Elder JOSEPH BIGGS, for preparing the Minutes of last year for 
the press, superintending the printing, recording one copy on our re- 

- cords, and distributing the Minutes to the several churches and Asso- 
ciations, as usual, - - - - - - $10 00 

Paid the Printer for printing 600 copies of last year's Minutes, 30 00 

40 00 



Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of $58 59 
The Association concurred with the report. 

10. Resolved, that the history of this Association be continued, from 
•where it closed, that was published by Elders Lemuel Burkit and Jesse 
Kead; and that Elder Joseph Biggs be requested to collect the necessary, 
materials and arrange them, with the assistance of Elders, Joshua Law- 
rence, William Hyman, Green Carrowan, Micajah Ambrose, and 
William B. Worrell; and that the Editor of these Minutes, be directed 
to insert some notice thereof to the several churches, to collect and furnish 
said committee, with necessary information, and forward to him or the 
committee, and when arranged by him, to be inspected by the others, be- 
fore the same is put to press. 

OlT^Ic is requested by the above committee, that the several churches, or some 
individual member thereof, endeavor to furnish them, with the following materi- 
als; (if the church has been constituted since the close of the former history, Oc- 
tober, 1802.) The date of its constitution; and by whom; its number when consti- 
tuted; its officers since; biographical sketches of the life and death of any very no- 
ted member; the county the church is situated in; and when the same is collected, 
to forward as ?>oon as possible to any of the above committee, or to the first named. 

11, Resolved, ihat Elder Joseph Biggs, be requested to prepare these 
Minutes for the press, superintend the printing of 700 copies, and distrib- 
ute them to the churches, composing this body, and the sister Associations 
corresponding with this, as usual. 

The Association then adjourned, to the time and place appointed, witfet 
prayer, by Elder Joseph Biggs. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator. 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



5 




DE YRLY BELOVED BRETHREN: We, the representatives of the 
several churches, composing the Kehnkee Association, having been per- 
mitted through a kind, and indulgent Providence, to meet in our annual 
Association, it seemeth good unto us, at this time, to address you by this 
our Epistle, on the all important subject, of the atonement made by our 
Lord Jesus Christ, for and in the behalf of sinners; and the more so, be- 
cause we hear that there is divisions among you dear brethren, about this 
doctrine, so essential to salvation; and believing as we do, that there is 
nothing more important to the peace, fellowship, harmony, happiness, and 
prosperity of the several churches of God, than a union and oneness of 
sentiment in members of a church, and in ministers of the gospel, more 
particular; as respects doctrine, ordinances, and discipline in order to their 
-happiness, and joint exertions to further, and promote the Redeemer's 
kingdom in the world. We design therefore, to lay before you our views 
from scripture, on the doctrine of the atonement for your consideration 
and comparing, with the word of God, in order if possible, that you may 
all be of the same mind, and speak the same things; and that there may be 
no division among you, dear brethren, a thing so destructive to the happiness 
of God's dear children, and the social union of ministers of the word of 
life. Knowing as we do, dear brethren, the dreadful strife and discord, 
that the doctrine of general atonement and special application has caused in 
the Baptist churches, in the States of Kentucky, and Tennessee, we 
wish if in our pow<^r that you should avoid falling into such a whirlpool 
a,nd peace-destroying contention and discord, as to set aged saints and min- 
isters, of Jesus Christ by the ears, and destroy the peace and harmony of 
the Kehukee Association. Since an universal atonement, without a uni- 
versal application, makes the eternal state of sinners no better, however 
plausible to men, such a doctrine whether general, or universal atonement: 
but as our limits are short, we can only touch on the subject and for the bal- 
ance must refer you dear brethren, to a careful and prayerful examination 
of the word of God. We are far from believing with Doctor Priestly, 
that there is no such thing as the atonement, because it would do away the 
idea of God's showing mercy to sinners; but on the contrary, that it is by 
and through the atonement that God shews, and manifests saving mercy to 
the chief of sinners; without which atonement, holiness, truth, law and 
justice, would forbid its being shewn; or in other words, the mercy of God 
chines with refulgent splendour, in providing by his foreknowledge the 
atonement, and then triumphs in manifesting the forgiveness of the sin- 
ner's sins to him, through the atonement Inade by Jesus Clirist, wfoe$ 
brought by the effectual working of the Holy Ghost to believe on ChrisT: 
then the atonement is only the medium or channel through which saving 
mercy is shewn, manifested and felt, in the hearts of sinners, by faith in 
him that atoned for them; which the v. and 11 of Romans shews. "But 
we also joy in God through our Lord Jeses Christ, by whom we have 
now received the atonement" Mark that word; "by whom we have re- 
ceived the atonement' 5 as shewing the atonement, and by whom it was 
made; to wit, Jesus Christ. Atonement, signifies a reconciliation made 
between parties, offended; and the price or ransom paid for an offender's 
deliverance, or a satisfaction made- for sin, by Jesus Christ And this 



6 

word atonement, occurs in between twenty and thirty places in the scrip- 
tures. • And the certainty of Christ's atonement in the fulness of time, 
was surelj set forth by the offering: of Abel's firstlings of the flock, as by 
faith it was done, and not by sight; Noah's clean beast, and Abraham's I- 
saac: of whom it was said lie received him in a figure; as a figure of whom, 
but Christ: And all the bloody sacrifices of the Jews, under the ceremonial 
law. their priests. &c« &c. must surely point as intentional figures, ordained 
of God, to set forth the great and bloody atonement which should be made 
by Jesus Christ, in the falness of the time on Calvary's hill, for sinners; 
the sin offering, the trespass, burnt, peace, with all other offerings of a 
blood}- nature; as well as the beast led to the door of ihe tabernacle, on 
whose head the Priest, laid his hands and confessed the sins of the Jewish 
nation: All bear evident marks of God's intention, and preached to the 
Jewish nation, the great atonement of Jesus Christ in these shadows; who 
should in the fulness of time bear the sins of men in his body on the tree; 
and by his blood purge their consciences from dead works to serve the li- 
ving God, and obtain eternal redemption further; of which truths, brethren, 
we believe \ou have no doubt; and therefore shall come to the matter oft- 
en in controversy, as the atonement is pretty generally on all hands ac- 
knowledged. 

And fir>t: Did Jesus Christ make a general, an universal, an equal, and 
sufficient atonement, for all mm kind; from Adam, to the end of the world? 
Or, was his atonement limited, to a special and particular people, say the 
elect only? Or, are there any different degrees, in this atonement by which 
it is effectual for one sinner, and not for another? Or, if sufficient for all, 
are the exertions of the sinner to make the difference! Or, if equal for all, 
and only effectual for those sinners to whom the Holy Ghost will appl} it? 
On one of these questions we think the whole truth must turn. As to a ge- 
neral atonement, no such a thing can exist; for then it must be superficial 
and uncertain altogether, whether ten or tens of thousands shall be s.ived, 
or none. And as to universal atonement, it must be absolutely made for 
ail; or conditionally made for all: if absolutely by decree or covenant en- 
gigement, Christ has died for all men's sins: then why and wherefore are 
not aa saved? it must be because the sinner will not seek it, or the Holy 
Ghost will not apply it Which is it? If it rest on the exertions of the sin- 
ner, then not all of grace. If on refusal of the Holy Ghost to apply the 
atonement made hy Christ forthe sinner, then you must say these three, 
are not one in will and purpose to do the same thing for the sinner. Be- 
loved, and if an equal atonement for all mankind, then works must make 
the difference why one sinner is not saved as well as another, or all saved; 
which will be contrary to the scheme of grace, and contrary to scripture. 
"By grace are ye saved." '"And by his mercy he has saved us " And 
again, "'not according to our works, but by his purpose and grace given us 
in Christ, before the world began, we are saved and called. " And if the 
atonement is sufficient for all; it will but depend cn the same, to wit: the 
sinner's exertions, or the application of the Holy Ghost; so turn it which 
way you will, all must rest on these two pivots, grace, or the works of the 
sinner, to make the difference, or the atonement effectual to the salvation of 
one sinner, and not another. Now there are some scriptures, which seem 
to shew an universal atonement; such as, "He gave himself a ransom for 
ail, to be testified in due time." "Who is the Saviour of all men." "Who 
will have all saved." "He died for the ungodly." "He came into the 
world to seek and to save, that which was lost." "He tasted death for 



7. 

every man:'' with a number of others. Now admit these all shew that 
there is an universal atonement; and that the thing 'is really so; you 
cannot believe according to the scripture, all will be saved; nor according 
to some men's conduct neither, for both show some men will not be saved: 
And why, not because there is not an atonement? but because the sinner 
will not seek it, or the Holy Ghost will not apply it; one of these grounds 
you must take, if an universal atonement. And will any dare say the Ho- 
ly Ghost, will not make the application, as far as the remedy is provided? 
We should say not. Then if an universal atonement, all must rest here; the 
works of the sinner must make the difference in men's being saved, whe- 
ther the universal atonemeut be absolutely or conditionally. But it so hap- 
pens, that the tenor of scripture is against this idea: such as, ''The Father 
seeketh such as worship him, in spirit and in truth." "They shall be all 
taught of God." "Every one that hears and learns of the Father, cometh. 
to Christ:" "made willing in the day of his power:" "found of God and 
led about:" "led in paths they have not known:" "darkness made light:" 
"he gives the blind" si^ht, the dead life:" "writes his law in their hearts, 
and puts them in their-minds:" and, "no man cometh to Christ, but by the 
drawing of the Father:" with a number of others, -which all shew, whether 
the atonement be universal, or not, it is the sovereign work of God, on the 
hearts of sinners^ that maketh the difference, why one sinner is saved, and. 
another not. There is one thing yet, and that is, if this universal atone- 
ment be on condition, what are the conditions on the sinner's part? It will 
be said good works, or repentance towards God, and faith in the Lord Je- 
sus. With the first he cannot comply, before the tree is made good; the 
two last is the gift of God, according to scripture. So that whether univer^ 
sal or not, all will end here: "by grace (or the gift of God,) are ye saved." 
So that it matters not, whether the atonement be universal, equal, and suffi- 
cient for all mankind; as it cannot be by the sinner applied to himself, but 
the application is wholly dependent on the sovereignty of the Holy Ghost; 
and we can see no use nor advantage for an atonement, without an applica- 
tion; or that it betters the stales of sinners to whom the Holy Ghost refu- 
ses to apply it. 

So that we conceive dear brethren, the truth lies here, according to the 
general tenor of scriptures; that God, by his forekno wledge of man's fall, 
and the helplessness of his posterity, chose and determined, before the 
world began, that Jesus Christ should he the saviour of the world; and then 
chose a people in him, before the foundation of the world; and that there 
can be no choice, where the whole is taken; and to these chosen, he gave 
grace in Christ before the world began, and purposed their salvation; and 
that he by his foreknowledge, chose them, predestinated them, to a confor- 
mity to his son; appointed them to obtain salvation by Jesus Christ; ordain- 
ed them to eternal life, and loved them with an everlasting love; and pre- 
destinated them to the adoption of sons by Jesus Christ, to the praise of the 
glory of his grace; and that these special objects of divine foreknowledge, 
love, choice and predestination, were given to Christ in covenant, to be 
raised up at the last day; and for which object of divine love, Christ gave 
himself in covenant to redeem them from ail iniquity, and purify to him- 
self a peculiar people, and chosen- generation; a royal priesthood and par- 
ticular people, on which God will make known the riches of his grace by 
the forgiveness of their sins through Je^us Christ; because he has afore pre- 
pared them unto glory, by choice, predestination, purpose, ordination and 
appointment, to obtain salvation by Jesus Christ, and therefore he gave 



8 

them to Christ, that he might raise them up at the last day, and gave him 
power over all flesh*, but restricted eternal life to as many as he had given 
him; and therefore Christ says, "all that the Father giveth him shall come 
to him," and none of this gift will he cast out; this choice in him, and this 
gift to him, is the people he represents; of these he is the head, the repre- 
sentative, the mediator, these are the purchased glorious church, that he 
might present, without spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; for these he 
was born, for these he lived, for these he died, for these he rose for justifi- 
cation, for these he prays, for these he maketh intercession, for these he is 
a propitiation; hence he says, "I lay down my life, for the sheep; the good 
shepherd giveth his life for the sheep; and other sheep I have which are 
not of this fold, (that is, not of the Jewish fold,) them must I also bring:" 
thus he calls them sheep, before they were brought; and he says, "speak 
Paul and hold not thy peace, for 1 have much people in this city;" his they 
were by gift and purchase, before converted, and to some Je$±is said, "you 
believe not because you are not of my sheep." And so the ransomed of the 
Lord shall return, and come to Zion, with songs and everlasting joy shall 
be on their heads; if all are ransomed, in the full sense of the word all, by 
the Lord; or he gave himselfa ransom for all, that is all mankind, then the 
promise happens not to be true; tho'.the promise says the ransomed of the 
Lord shall come, yet we see all do not come; then will it not be most cor- 
rect with scripture and observation to say, that these ails, are to be taken in 
a limited and restricted sense; as we know a great many in scripture must 
to harmonize truth or scripture: so we shall say God's chosen in Christ, 
and God's gift to Christ, before the world began, is all he died for, or could 
represent, and is the all ransomed; and these all shall come to Zion, shall 
come to Christ, shall obtain everlasting joy; they have their names written 
in the lamb's book of life from the foundation of the world, and had a king- 
dom prepared for them at the same time, and it is the Father's good plea- 
sure to give it to this little flock; and whosoever's name was not found 
written in the lamb's book, which we say contains the gift of the father to 
the son, was cast into the lake of fire: Hence these special and particular 
people, are spoken of as such, throughout the old and new testament, and a 
thousand promises made them, even while in an unconverted state; such as, 
"I will bring the blind, by the way they have not known, the dead shall 
hear the voice of the son of God, "&c. &c. These arc the wheat among the 
tares, the seed, the children of the kingdom, the, thy children, the treasure 
hid in the field; and hundreds of other places their speciality and particu- 
larity is spoken of: hence they -are said to be redeemed irom among men 
redeemed from the earth, and again redeemed to God, by thy blood out of 
every kindred and tongue and people and nation; if all were redeemed by 
his blood, how could it be said, redeemed out of, or from among men, 
which shews all were not redeemed by the biood of the son of God. 
Hence the speciality of the atonement does equally plainly appear redeem- 
ed by the blood out of every kindred: "I lay down my life for the sheep;" 
"you believe not because you are not of my sheep," then if there was any 
thabwas not Christ's sheep, a k nd he laid down his life for the sheep only, 
there is some then, for which he did not lay down his life: again, "the 
Lord's portion is his people," that is, his given and purchased people: again, 
"all that came before me were thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not 
hear them:" and again, "he shall divide a portion with the strong, and the 
spoil with the great because he hath poured out his soul unto death:" and a- 
gain, "they are not all Israel, which are of Israel, but in Isaac shall thy 



9 

seed be called. " And again, "though the children of Israel be as the sand 
of the sea, a remnant shall be saved. " And why? because, "the Lord will 
finish the work, and cut it short in righteousness, for a short work will the 
Lord make on the earth." And again, "elect according to the foreknow- 
ledge of God, the Father, through sanctification of the spirit, unto obedi- 
ence, and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ." Again, "who verily 
was foreordained before the foundation of the world, bat was manifest in 
these last times for you." Again, "feed the flock of God, which he has 
purchased with his own blood." Again, "having predestinated us unto 
the adoption of children, by Jesus Christ; in whom we have redemption 
through h'S blood, the forgiveness of sins." Again, "in whom also we 
have obtained atx inheritance, being predestinated according to the pur- 
pose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will. " Let 
this be the cap stone: "But God who is rich in mercy, for his great love, 
wherewith he loved us, even when we were dead in sins, hath he quicken- 
ed us together with Christ, by grace are ye saved;" with a hundred other 
scriptures to the same point, shewing the speciality of persons, and the 
atonement; and special provisions for their time, and eternal welfare. 
"For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to 
the image of his son, that he might be the first born among many brethren; 
moreover, whom" he did predestinate, them he also called; and whom he 
called, them he also justified, and whom he justified, he also glorified." 
What shall we then say to these things, but that the whole scheme of man's* 
redemption, and regeneration of his soul, and eternal glorified state, is of 
God's grace, from the foundation to the top stone. And is any man so 
blind as not to see in the above text, that the same special them, runs thro* 
this golden chain of God's purpose from his foreknowledge, to the special 
sinner's glorification; and that predestination is the effect of God's fore- 
knowledge; and the calling or conversion of the sinner, is the effect of 
God's having predestinated him, to a conformity to his son; and that justi- 
fication is the effect of God's calling the sinner by his spirit, and making 
the application of the atonement of Christ, for his justification, by his blood; 
by the application of which, the sinner feels himself clear, and acquitted of 
his guilt; and that glorification in heaven, is the effect of justification, or 
being forgiven, we think none will deny. Now if these things be accord- 
ing to the scriptures, of which we have no doubt, what will an universal, 
or an equal and sufficient atonement, avail for any; if not foreknown, if not 
predestinated, if not called, if not justified nor glorified? We can see no 
profit such an universal atonement will be, to the balance of mankind: For 
we find a special them foreknown, a special them predestinated, a special 
them called, a special them justified, and the same special them glorified. 
Then it is God that justifies these, and Christ that died for these; and who 
shall lay any thing to the charge of God's elect, (or chosen?) For these, the 
world was made; for these the world stands; and if the Lord God had not 
^ave left us this seed, we had been made like Soo*om and Gomorrah. On 
these he maketh known the riches of his grace; these vessels of mercy, 
these foreknown, these beloved, these chosen, these predestinated, these 
appointed to obtain salvation, these ordained to eternal life j believe; these 
foreknown sheep believe; these called, these justified, these shall be saved 
In the Lord, by his atonement; (the whole tenor of scripture shews;) with 
an everlasting salvation, they shall not be ashamed nor confounded, worlcj 
without end. Yet all this, does not supercede the necessity of God's means 
to accomplish his ends ? for the means is as mudi ordained, and appointed 



10 

of God, as the rest. And although there are many scriptures that seem to 
be so expressed, as to mean an universal and sufficient atonement for all 
mankind, yet we believe the atonement was special for the elect, or God's 
chosen people only; for we cannot believe that God made his son to be sin 
for a man, and that, that man might be made the righteousness of God in 
him; and yet that man be lost. Nor can we believe it can be consistent with 
the justice of God, to punish a man's sins in Christ; and then send that man 
to hell, and punish him in hell, for the same sins for whom Christ died, 
when it is expressly said, "he bore our sins in his own body; he was made 
a curse for us; he died the just for the unjust; and when he had by himself 
purged our sins, he set down at the right hand of God." That although 
these scriptures are expressed in the general terms; for all were unjust, all 
had sins to bear and purge away; yet there are other scriptures which limit 
the atonement; such as, "this is my blood of the new testament which is 
shed for many, for the remission of sins." And again, "so Christ was once 
offered to bear the sins of many. " And again, "so by the obedience of one, 
shall many be made righteous." And many more of the same import; 
while this one text may give us an idea of the manner in which the scrip- 
tures are written: "Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners," mark 
well the text; Paul don't say Jesus came into the world to save all sinners; 
if he had, he would have contradicted scripture and observation: nor did 
Paul say, Jesus came into the world to save some sinners; if he had, we 
should have now been disputing as much, what sinners, and what sort of 
sinners, he came to save; as we are now about the universality or sufficien- 
cy of the atonement. Even so by this, and a great many scriptures, "he 
came to seek and save that which was lost;" he don't say all the lost, nor 
some of the lost: "he came to call not the righteous, but sinners to repent- 
ance;" he don't say all sinners, or some sinners to repentance: even so, "he 
died the just, for the unjust;" he don't say all the unjust, nor some of the 
unjust: so by a hundred other scriptures. And should not this method of 
preaching, and writing, by Christ and his apostles, teach us, that we are to 
preach the gospel to every creature, to all sinners in general? Should it not 
teach us, that it is a secret with God, for whom Christ died? Should it not 
teach us, that we are to preach the gospel to sinners in the general, and leave 
it to God to make the application to the persons he has chosen, or when and 
where he pleases? Should it not teach us, that we know nothing about 
the length and breadth of the atonement, but as God applies it, and sets the 
sinner free? Should it not teach us, not to be wise above what is written? 
Should it not teach us the vanity of all our arguments, and that we cannot 
know the truth of it, until it shall be more fully revealed? Should it not 
teach us, to do each one his duty, and leave the event to God? Should it 
not teach us, not to fall out as brethren on mere speculation, but bear and 
forbear, since all are infected with this disease, more or Jess? Therefore, 
dear brethren, we think all contention on this secret anjdf mysterious sub- 
ject only calculated to gender strife and sow discord, and disunion among 
brethren, and to be fully fraught with strife, about words that can end in 
no profit to saint or sinner; but distress to our churches, of which we all 
must feel the painful effects, less or more. For supposing, Christ has made 
an universal and sufficient atonement for all mankind equally; you are still 
forced to say, "they must be born again; or born of the water, and of the 
spirit, before they can see the kingdom of heaven; or be converted, and be- 
come as little children, or be renewed in the spirit of their minds; or crea- 
ted in Christ Jesus; or repent, and believe in Christ;" before the atonement 
can avail them any thing, though it be universal. And without which re- 



11 

quisitions, the atonement profits no man any thing. Why and wherefore 
then, should brethren fall out about that, that cannot profit no man any 
thing for believing, or disbelieving; since with an universal or special 
atonement all must believe in Christ, or be damned; to this all hands must 
agree: then it is a dissention and strife, among us to little profit, all may 
see. For suppose a man believes in a sufficient atonement, for all man- 
kind, on condition the sinner seeks it, and he don't seek it; why it profits 
the sinner nothing: and suppose an universal atonement, and then the spirit 
won't apply it, why you are forced to say, it profits no man any thing, to 
whom it is not applied: thus we should be taught moderation, to respect 
the opinions of others, as well as our own, knowing we are also in the flesh. 
Then after all the strife, dear brethren, that may arise in contention about 
the speciality, or universality, or sufficiency of the atonement, it will all 
turn on this pivot; that whether we believe in a sufficient or special atone- 
ment, there must be faith in Christ, to save the soul; or whether we seek it 
or not, or whether the spirit apply it or not, all ends here: "he that believ- 
eth and is baptised, shall be saved; and he that believeth not, shall be dam- 
ned." Can any one say then why he should keep up strife in the church 
of God for that, that cannot profit any man, or make the state of sinners 
better. But the devil has always made use of these hair-splitting, mys- 
terious doctrines, to destroy the peace and fellowship of the church of God, 
by means of speculative minds. Witness free will, free agency, consub- 
stantiation, transubstantiation, &c. &c. what havoc they have made in times 
past, among saints, in destroying their peace; while we would recommend 
in brotherly love, that such persons have great reason to suspect they have 
entered the wide and dangerous field of speculation, and without due care, 
they at last will lament, when too late, as many others have done before 
them; for the field of the word of God has been explored in part, by other 
minds perhaps as large as theirs; and thousands have brought up on this 
ground, and stood unshaken during life, that God for a purpose of his own 
glory, did elect a certain number of angels, and men to eternal life, and 
that this election is particular, eternal, and unconditional, on the creature's 
part; and for these, Jesus gave himself to redeem them from all iniquity; 
and for these he died and atoned, and rose for their justification; and that 
these shall be called, sanctified, and persevere in holiness, to eternal salva- 
tion, and never. fall finally away; all of which is fully established by the 
word of God. We would therefore, dear brethren, that you should stand 
fast in the faith; and contend earnestly for the faith once delivered, to the • 
saints, always abounding in the work of the Lord, for as much as you know 
your labor is not in vain in the Lord. And now, dearty beloved brethren, 
to conclude, if an universal or sufficient atonement made the state of sinners 
better, without an application, then we should not blame men for contend- 
ing for such a doctrine; but as all is dependent on the sovereign applica- 
tion of the spirit of God, we see at present no need of the strife we hear of; 
but that we should preach and enforce as the scriptures say, "repentance to- 
wards God, and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ:" and that, "Jesus came in- 
to the world to save sinners, and that ye must be born again, or not see the 
kingdom of heaven:" and leave the issue to God, when we have done our 
duty severally or jointly; and thus harmonize in important truths, and not 
fall out on that which we cannot determine, or if determined, would avail 
nothing, without an application to a sinner's heart, to cleanse him from all 
sin. Therefore, brethren, farewell; be of one mind, love one another, con- 
tend not for trifles to create strife, do every man his duty, live in peace? 
t and the God of love and peace shall be with you. 



11 



TO THE 

ICehukee Baptist Association^ 

IN NORTH-CAROLINA. 

Your unknown Brother in the Lord sendeth greeting: 
Grace and peace be multiplied unto yon. 

I am thankful to Almighty God for that you have distinguish- 
ed yourselves in the streets of Zion, by taking a decided stand 
on the part of God and truth in this awful day of rebuke and 
blasphemy; and also in boldly protesting against the alarming 
outrages, and corruptions of the age in which we Jive. In no- 
thing more can we demonstrate our zeal and love to God, and 
tyw- attachment to, and warm regard for the cause of gospel 
Zion, than by vindicating the honors of the Lord and boldly 
standing up in the defence of Zion in a dark and cloudy day 
as this is. Men in our day are seeking honor' one of another, 
and not the honor which coraeth from God only. And I am 
glad at heart that you see and know that in the midst of the 
great outcry, bustle, and parade, which have long been made, 
and is at this time made, about religion, and what is called the 
flourishing state of the church of Christ; divine truth, the glori- 
ous scheme of redemption, the eternal purposes, decrees, and 
counsels of Jehovah, are lost sight of and treated with cold in- 
difference, and in many cases with contempt and scorn. And 
as you can see these things, so are you enabled through grace to 
protest against them, and to leave the event with him who hath 
said, "Them that honor me I will honor," 1 Samuel, 2. 30. 

Brethren, to me it evidently appears that we have arrived at 
the alarming point to which an ancient worthy once alluded 
when he said, "Perilous times shall come:" and in these times 
the spirit by the same writer, "expressly says that some shall 
depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits and doc- 
trines of devils." And if these things are not now passing in 
swift review before our eyes, we may for ever despair of having 
anyone thing clearly proven to us in the whole current of e- 
vents amongst men. And hence if there ever was a time since 
the first promulgation of the gospel, when it became necessary 



f3 

for the Saints and the public servants of God to be in an espe- 
cial manner, valiant for the precious truth as it is in Jesus, and 
bold for God, and determinate in opposing a counterfeit religion, 
it is now! even now.' for this is a dark day, and the "shadows 
of the evening are stretched out," Jer. 6. 4, and the "sun is 
gone down over many prophets, and the day is dark over them," 
Micah. 3. 6; "and judgment is turned away backward, and jus- 
tice standeth afar off; for truth is fallen in the street, and equi- 
ty cannot enter;" Isaiah, 59. 14. 

Men who can stand in the pulpit and aim at tickling the fan- 
cy, charming the ear, and amusing the minds of a gay and dres- 
sy congregation with empty sound, great swelling words, mild 
accents, and a genteel address; and shaping their discourses, 
and preaching doctrines congenial to the natural feelings and 
views of men who are carnal and dead in soul, cannot be said 
to be the servants of the most high God who shew unto us the 
way of salvation, or that they preach the gospel in demonstra- 
tion of the spirit and of power. Nor can they themselves with 
safely say as did Paul, "Neither at any time used we flattering 
words; nor of men sought we glory," 1. Thess. 2. 5, 6. Men 
taught of God and sent forth by him to preach the word of life 
to dying men, dare not so to trifle with their God, with their 
sacred office, with divine things, or with the souls of men. With 
them it is no small matter to negotiate business for the King 
of Kings in favor of apostate mortals, and by and through which 
negotiation their souls are eternally to be saved. It behoves 
them to be grave, solemn, serious, and earnest in the business 
they are sent on, and not to sport qmd trifle with things of such 
vast importance. 

But if a very many preachers among us are not altogether 
carnal and light and trifling, and only zealous in a bad cause; 
(a false religion) and if a great name amongst great men, and 
popularity, and seeking honor one of another, are not the most 
prominent traits in many of our churches; and if a great part of 
the precious gospel ofthe son of God, is not lost sight of and 
kept back for fear of giving offence by preaching it, and a new' 
fangled gospel introduced in the place of it, by which things 
God is mocked, and dishonored, and the saints of the Lord 
cheated of their right, and empty professors built up in their 
most unholy faith: — I say if the above things are not so among 
us, 1 am willing as Job says, that any man should "make me a 
liar and my speech nothing worth," Job, 24. 25. I can see 
these things and am grieved that they are so; and I have in the 
strength of the Lord borne my public testimony against them, 
as you may see by consulting my writings; and two things I 



14 

have gained by it; yea, there are three things that I have obtain- 
ed thereby; nay, there are four things in which 1 am profited 
by it: — 

1. 1 have gained the good will of God. 

2. The answer of a good conscience. 

3. The approbation of christians. 

4. The derision of carnal preachers and their carnal hearers. 
And here with Paul I can say, "Every where and in all things 

] am instructed;" and by the help of the Lord I design to pur- 
sue the same steady and uniform course as laid down by Paul 
the aged, namely, Witnessing both to small and great, saying 
cone other things than those which Moses in the law, and the 
prophets did say should come. 1 also, agreeably with the 
word of God, shall protest against the corruptions of our times, 
and I hope my ministering brethren of your Association will 
pursue the same course and so finish their "race with joy and 
the ministry which they have received of the Lord Jesus, to tes- 
tify the gospel of the grace of God," Acts, 20,. 24. 

Brethren it would be grateful to my feelings to be with you 
at your Association, but this pleasure is denied me; but by the 
will of God I hope to be with you in a day yet to come. May 
God be with you in council and grant you wisdom to conduct 
all your affairs for his glory and Zion's good. I hope and wish 
that peace, love, and concord, may be felt and enjoyed among 
you when you are together as an Association, and in your chur- 
ches throughout; and that the preaching of the gospel may be 
greatly blest of t he Lord in your part of the vineyard of Christ. 
1 know not whether these few lines will be presented to you at 
your Association, as I shall leave the propriety or impropriety 
of it to the pleasure of my highly esteemed friends and breth- 
ren belonging to the Coenjock church near Currituck Court- 
House. But should it be handed to you, I hope my christian 
freedom with you will not be viewed as an intrusion, but as a 
mark of respect for you as an Association for the bold stand you 
have taken in the defence of the gospel and protesting against 
wrongs and outrages. If you would favor me with a copy of 
your Minutes when they come out I would thank you. 

May the best of blessings attend you all your days,.and make 
you a loving and a happy people, is the wish and desire of your 
Humble Servant, 

JAMES OSBOUPvN. 

Baltimore, July 29th, 1830. 



Free Press— Ihrboro' N. C. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Kehukee Baptist Association, 

HOLDEN AT 

riiAT SWAMP MEETING-HOUSE, 

Pitt County, JV. C. 
The 1st, 2d, and 3d of October, 1831. 



SATURDAY, October 1st, 183L 

1. The Elders appointed to preach the Introductory Ser- 
mon being indisposed and absent, the same was done by Elder 
Joshua Lawrence, from Hebrews, xiii chap, and 1st verse: 
"Let brotherly love continue." 

2. The Association then convened, and being opened with 
prayer by Elder William Hyman, proceeded to business; when 
Elder William Hyman was chosen Moderator; Elder Joseph 
Biggs, Clerk; who called to his assistance Brother Joseph Do 
Biggs. 

Brethren in the Ministry, from sister Associations, were in= 
vited to seats with us, when brethren John Adkinson and Mark 
JEZ. Bennett from the Contentnea, and Amos Rayner, from the 
Chowan Associations, seated themselves, 

3. Letters from forty-two churches were read, and the dele- 
gates seated themselves; took the following account from the 
churches, as stated in the table of churches. 



CHURCHES. 



2 



MINISTERS & DELEGATES. 



1 Baregrass, — 

2 Blount's Creek,- 

3 Cowenjock, 

4 Conoho, — 

5 Conetoe, — 

6 Concord, 

7 Cross- Roads, 

8 Z)ee/i Creek, — 

9 Falls Tar River ,- 

10 Fishing Creek, 

11 .F/a? Swamp, 

12 Frying Pan, 

13 Goose Creek, 

14 Great Swamp,- 

15 Grindle Creek, 

16 Kehukee, — 

17 Lawrence's M.H 

18 Zi^/e Alligator, - 

19 Mattamuskeet, — 

20 Maple Spring,— 

21 Mearns' Chapel, - 

22 A/ora«ock, — 

23 Abr^ Creek, 

24 O/c? ^orrf, — 

25 Peac/* Tree, 

26 P*co£ M if. — 

27 PoweVs Point,— 

28 Pungo, — 

29 Qwankei/,— 

30 Red Bud, — 

31 i?ee% Creek, — 

32 Rocky Swamp,— 

33 Sandy Creek, 

34 Sapponey, --- 

35 Scuppcrnong ,— 

36 Skewarkey, 
37Smithwick's Cr.~ 

38 Sound Side, — 

39 Spring Green,— 
40-Tarborough, — 

41 Tranter's Crcek^ 

42 Washington, 

43 W/fa'te Plains, 



U Williams' M.IL-- 



Daniel Biggs, Noah Gurganes, 
John Jones,* Lodowick Redditt, 
SAMUEL TATUM, John Eady, 
John Bryant, Asa Jones, 
John H. Daniel, William Thigpen, 
MIC A J AH AMBROSE, Daniel 

Clifton,* - 
WM. HYMAN, Wm. R. Long, 
Thomas Godwin,* 
Dorris Brake,* James S. Battle, 
PHILEMON BENNETT * Wil- 
lie Powell,* 
LUKE WARD,* Edmund An- 
drews, Wm. Clements, 
JOHN RICHARDSON,* - 
GREEN CARROWAN, Henry 

C arrow, - 
Willis Fleming, Josiah Carney, 
WM. CLARK,* Robe. F.Lanier, 

Jacob D. Harrington, 
John Shield,* General Younn;,* 
JOSHUA LAWRENCE, Drury 

Bryant, - 
Lemuel Basnight, Joseph Evans, 
Wm. Boomer,* Washington Car- 
rowan, - - - 
Joseph J. Harper, Allen Bowdy, 



S«i bi & H 



§8 

a . 2r 



S a. 
^ -T j£ * 



Charles Blount,* Jacob Wilkerson, 
LEMUEL ROSS,* Jacob Conner, 
John Hodges, James Hodges, 
WM. B. WORRELL,* G. Bass * 
Joshua Robertson, John G. Smith- 
wick, - 
James Melson, Willoby Sawyer,* 
Richard Davis,* John R. Davis, 

John Q.Drake, Elias Hedgepeth,* 

B. Bailey," Warren Sherrod,* 
Fred'k Leonard, Joseph J. Pierce, 
Granberry Vick, Abs'm B. Baines, 

JOSEPH BIGGS, John Ward, 
Micajah Perry, Humphrey Stal- 

lings, - 
Zebulon Kemp, Isaac Meekins,* 
Le welling Bowers, Wm. Gray, 
Cofield King, BarthoPw Bowers, 
JEREMI'H LEGGITT ,« Mercer 

D. Wilson, Marshall D. Wilson, 
George Elliott, Levin Wallace, 
MILES EVERITT," Jonathan 

Wallace, - 
David Bradley, 



3 
96 

2 
6 
1 

152 



41 



1 1 

2 2 



35 | 1 00 
461 1 0q 
90'| t 00 
59 1 1 00 
27jj 1 00 

461 1 .50 
42, 1 00 
1 00 



59 

89': 

I 

79. 

92, 
24 

I 

32 

ioo; 

i 

97 
138 

66 



2 00 



1 50 
1 47 

1 00 
1 50 

1 50 

75 

1 50 
12 1 i 00 



113 3 3 00 

114 I 

97j 

90j|l 60 
6411 80 



32 
199 



1 ! 2 



Total, 429 28?26 3139 21 2683 42 42 



1 00 



1 00 

50 
1 00 



52 
20 
12 
25 
63 
25 
66 
65| 

64j 1 00 

25] 
82: 



46; 
25' 
5l! 
54 

j 

49 

30 
49 



2 00 



1 00 
1 50 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 
1 00 

1 30 
1 00 



NOTE. Pastors of Churches, and other ordained Ministers, are in small CA- 
PITALS; unordained Ministers in italics; those marked thus, * were not present, 
From Churches marked thus, f we received no intelligence; in that case their nunv 
ber stands as last year. Dashes, — denote no Pastor. The last column shows the 
contributions from the Churches to the Association fund. 



3 

4. A Petitionary letter from a church at PowePs Point, Cur- 
rituck county, (formerly a member of the Chowan Association) 
for membership in this Association, was handed in by their 
messengers, James Melson and Willoby Sawyer; the same was 
read, and after learning the difficulties under which they labor- 
ed and their faith, they were received as a member of this bor 
dy with 20 members. 

5. The following committees were appointed, viz: Elders 
Joshua Lawrence, Green Carrowain, and Micajah Ambrose, 
to examine the Circular Letter; Brethren James S. Battle and 
Wm. R. Long, on finance; Elder William Hyman to write to 
the Contentnea Association; Brother Joseph D. Biggs to write 
to the Little River Association; all to report on Monday next. 

6. Elders William Hyman and Joshua Lawrence are re- 
quested (by private ballot) to occupy the stage by preaching on 
the morrow. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by Brother Ad" 
kinson, until Monday morning next, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

SUNDAY, 2d October, 1831. 

Elder Green Carrowan preached from Joshua, vii chap, 
and part of 25th verse: "And Joshua said, why hast thou trou- 
bled usl the Lord shall trouble thee this day." Elder Joshua 
Lawrence preached from St. Mark, xvi chap, and part of 15th 
verse: "Preach the gospel unto every creature." Elder Wil- 
liam Hyman closed the services of the day by singing and 
prayer. 

MONDAY MORNING, October 3d, 1831. 

7. The Association assembling (agreeable to adjournment) 
was opened with prayer by Elder Joseph Biggs, after which 
proceeded to business. 

8. The churches at Sappony, Sandy Creek, Maple Springs 
Red Bud, Peach Tree, Rocky Swamp, Quanky, Mearns' Cha- 
pel, and Fishing Creek, having petitioned for letters of dismis- 
sion from this body to form another Association, (with other 
churches from the Raleigh and Flat River Associations,) they 
say for convenience and no other cause; and on motion, agreed 
that the prayer of their petition be granted; and Elder Joshua 
Lawrence is requested to draft and give them a letter of dis- 
mission under the signature of the Moderator and Clerk of this 
Association. 

9. The committees appointed on Saturday last, were called 
on to report; the one to examine the Circular Letter reported 
that they had done the same, and recommended it to tbisbody ? 
and that it be read herein; the same was done and ordered to be 
attached to these Minutes; — the one to write to the Contentnea 



4 

Association handed in a letter which was read and approved, 
and assigned by the Moderator and Clerk, and brethren John 
J. Daniel and Edmund Andrews appointed our messengers; — 
the one to write to the Little River Association handed in a let- 
ter which was read and approved, and assigned by the Modera- 
tor and Clerk, and brethren John Ward and James S. Battle 
appointed our messengers. 

The committee on finance reported, that — • 
There was in the hands of the Treasurer, at the close of the last 

Association, the sum of - $5S 59 

Paid for printing the Minutes of last year, - $30 00 

Transcribing and preparing those Minutes for the press, 
superintending the printing and recording one copy on 
the Association records, and distributing them as usual, 10 00 

40 00 

$18 59 

Heceived in contributions from the churches at this Association, 

the sum of - - - - - - 42 42 



Leaving a balance in the hands of the Treasurer, of $61 01 
The Association concurred with the report. 

10. A letter from James Osborne, of Baltimore, to this As- 
sociation was read; and agreed that Elder Joshua Lawrence 
acknowledge the receipt of the same in the name of this Asso- 
ciation. 

11. The committee appointed last Association to collect ma- 
terials to continue the History of the Kehukee Association 
from its close by Elders Lemuel Burkitt and Jesse Read to 
this time, reported, that they had collected some materials, but 
that there were others necessary to obtain; that those collected 
were not yet prepared for the press, and that it was the ardent 
wish of many that the former History and latter materials 
should be embodied in one volume; whereupon the Association 
agreed that the aforesaid committee arrange them (with any 
other materials that may come to hand in time) as in their judg- 
ment they may deem most proper. Elder Joseph Biggs is re- 
quested to superintend the same, and that the work, say print- 
ing and binding, be given to Mr. George Howard, on his own 
responsibility, and a subscription list be sent to the different 
churches in this body for subscribers. 

12. Resolved, that the temporary bounds heretofore known 
and established in this Association be removed, and that the 
future Associations be held with the churches respectively as 
they may think most advisable. 

13. Resolved, that our next Association be holden at Cono- 
ho, (Log Chapel,) to commence on Saturday before the first 



5 

Sunday in October, 1832, and that public worship commence 
at 11 o'clock, A. M. and that Elder Joseph Biggs be request- 
ed to deliver a sermon introductory to business, and Elder 
Green Carrowan in case of his failure. 

14. Elder Joshua Lawrence, is requested to prepare a Cir- 
cular Letter for our next Association. 

15. Queries were called for, when the following was handed 
in, read and received for debate: — "Are ministers of the gospel 
(in our churches) authorized to lay their hands by way of pres- 
bytery on any person set before thern (by the church) for the 
office of minister or deacon, and if they are, what doth it con- 
vey!" Which was answered in the following manner, viz: — 
"The New Testament points out four things for which the 
apostles laid on their hands — first, to give the Holy Ghost — se- 
condly, to give the gift of the ministry — thirdly, to ordain dea- 
cons — fourthly to ordain to the ministry. For to lay on hands 
in the two last cases ministers, we think, are authorized from 
the examples of the New Testament, for the churches safety. 
In the vi chap, of Acts: 'Look you out among yourselves seven 
men of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost, and wisdom, 
whom you may appoint.' Here laying on of hands was not to 
give the Holy Ghost, but to appoint, to set apart, and ordain to 
office, to the concerns of the poor of the church, &c. Then in 
xiii of Acts, read: 'As they ministered, (who! to wit: Barnabas, 
Simeon, Lucius, Manaen and Saul, these five teachers were all 
in the church at Antioch,) the Holy Ghost said, (to the church,) 
separate me Barnabas and Saul to the work whereunto I have 
called them; and when they had fasted and prayed, and laid 
their hands on them, they sent them away.' Here you see Paul 
and Barnabas were ministering in the church before hands were 
laid on them; then it was not to give them the gift of the minis- 
try, nor the Holy Ghost; but to set apart^ and ordain Barnabas 
and Saul to the office of the ministry, to administer the ordi- 
nances, to plant churches in the heathen world; without which 
ordination no man has a right to do, or they either. Then lay- 
ing on of hands of a presbytery, conveys nothing but office, a 
setting apart to office, a responsibility of office, a power to ad- 
minister the ordinances, a power to plant churches, a power to 
feed and oversee the church of God and rule over the church 
according to God's word, as they that must give an account, 
God commissioned John the Baptist, and Jesus Christ, to office; 
Jesus Christ commissioned and ordained the twelve and the 
seventy; the church in Jerusalem and the apostles, ordained 
the deacons; and the church at Antioch, with Simeon, Lucius 
and Manaen? (who were teachers, > Barnabas and Saul to the 



6 

ministry. Thus the power of ordination of deacons or minis- 
ters is vested in the church, and none has a right to convey it 
but the church, nor the power; and here she ought to be cau- 
tious, very cautious, since she is accountable to Jesus Christ for 
sending, or holding in fellowship, such as preach false doctrines* 
R&ad the three first chapters of John's Revelations." 

16. Resolved, that 500 copies of these Minutes be printed, 
and distributed as usual to the several churches and sister As- 
sociations. 

17. Resolved, that Elder Joseph Biggs be requested to tran- 
scribe these Minutes for (lie press, superintend the priming, 
and record one copy on the Association records, and distribute 
them as usual. 

The Association then adjourned Jo the time and place ap- 
pointed, with an address by the Moderator, and prayer by El- 
der Joshua Lawrence. 

WILLIAM HYMAN, Moderator, 
JOSEPH BIGGS, Clerk. 



The Ministers, and other Messengers, of the several Baptist churches, 
belonging to the Kehukee Baptist Association, assembled at Flat Swamp 
Meeting- House, Pitt county, North-Carolina, Saturday before the first 
Sunday in October, 1S31, to the respective churches they represent— Grace 
be to you, and peace from God the Father, and from our Lord Jesus Christ. 

Once more, (by divine permission,) we have enjoyed a happy, and plea- 
sing interview with each other, for which, we desjre to give thanks unto 
our gracious God and Father, and for sending his ministers to preach the 
word of life to. us; from whose lips our ears have been saluted with the 
God-honoring and soul-comforting doctrine of salvation by grace. 

Some of you will doubtless remember, that in the year 1777, our Asso- 
ciation of churches was first formed, on our present plan and belief; and 
that the History thereof, was published up to the year 1S03— and that 
there was a resolution adopted at our last Association (1830,) for its conti- 
nuance up to that time. 

In the former History, is contained the abstract of the principles, (or be- 
lief,) of the churches that then formed the Association: But since those 
days, many have arisen, that have discarded these articles of belief, and 
yet are called Baptists; and many others, (for the lack of strictly attending 
to the scriptures,) on the important subject these articles of faith bring to 
view, and on which our Association was founded, have produced jars and 
contentions in the Baptist churches, and caused the enemies of Zion to re- 
joice. Therefore, it is thought advisable to recapitulate them, and bring 



ihcm to view again, aim the scriptures that support- them; believing this 
method will revive the truly pious. This short confession of faith (it is 
true) is only an abstract; for it is the Bible which contains the whole of our 
belief, which will appear from the quotations made. And could we be 
convinced that we have declared to believe, one thing, (as stated is these 
articles,) that is not fully supported by the word of God, it should no lon- 
ger be an article of our 'faith- — we therefore send you the following, in lieu 
of a common ordinary Circular Letter. We will give you the number of 
those articles, and to them add those scriptures for their support, on which 
our faith is founded. 

1. We believe in the being of a God, as almighty, eternal, unchangeable, of in- 
finite wisdom, power, justice, holiness, goodness, mercy and truth; and that this 
God has revealed himself, in his word, under the characters of Father, Son, 
and Holy Ghost. 

The scriptures to support the being of a God, as almighty, see Gen. 
xxxv chap, part of llth verse: 'And said unto him, I am God Almighty/ 
That he is eternal, see Deuteronomy, xxxiii chap, part of the 27th verse; 
'The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms.' 
That, he is unchangeable, see Malachi, iii chap. 6th verse: 'I am the Lord, 
1 change not; therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.' That he is 
of infinite wisdom, see Acts, xv chap. ISth verse: 'Known unto God are 
all his works, from the beginning of the world.' For his power, see Ixii 
Psalm, l\ih verse: 'God hath spoken once; twice have I heard this, that 
power belongeth unto God.' That he is a God of justice, see Nehemiah, 
ix chap. 33d verse: 'Howbeit thou art just in all that is brought upon us; 
for thou hast done right, bat we have done wicked.' Also, see Isaiah, 
xlv chap- part of 21st verse: *A just God and a Saviour.' That he is a 
God of holiness, see Exodus, xv chap, part of the llth verse: 'Who is 
like unto thee, glorious in holiness.' That he has revealed himself under 
the character of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, see 1st Epistle of John, v 
chap. 7th verse: 'For there are three that bare record in heaven, the Fa- 
ther, the Word, and the Holy Ghost; and these three are one.' Also, St. 
Mathew, xxviii chap. 19th verse: 'Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, 
baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost.' 

H, We believe, that Almighty God has made known his mind, and will to the 
children of men in his word; which word, we believe, to be of divine authority, 
and contains all things necessary to be known for the salvation of men and wo- 
men, the same is comprehended or contained, iu the boo,ks of the Old and New- 
Testament, a§ are commonly received. 

To support this article, see 2d Timothy, iii chap. 1 6th and 17th verses: 
'All scripture-is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, 
for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of 
God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.' 

III. We believe that God, before the foundation of the world, for a purpose of 
his own glory, did elect a certain number of men, and angels to eternal life; and 
that this election is particular, eternal, and unconditional on the creature's part. 

We think it must be granted, that Christ who is the head of the church, 
was elected before the foundation of the world, see Isaiah xlii chap. 1st 
verse: ^Behold my servant, mine elect, in whom my soul delighteth; I 
have put my spirit upon him; he shall bring forth judgment unto the Gen- 
tiles.' And this same elect Son said unto his Father, St. John, xvii chap, 
24th verse: 'Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be 
with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast giv 



8 

an naej for thou iovesl me before the foundatioivof the world. 5 And, if the 
election of the Head, was personal from eternity, why not theirs that 
should make up his body; since they really did exist then, as the human 
nature of Christ did. Besides, it was very agreeable and correct that he and 
they should both be appointed together; for he could not be a head, but 
w T ith respect to a body, see Ephesians, v chap. 23d verse: 'For the hus- 
band is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church; and 
lie is the Saviour of the body.' Verse the 30th: 'For we are members of 
his body, of his flesh, and of his bones.' Also, see the remarks of the 
apostle Paul, in his first epistle to the Ephesians, i chap. 3d verse: 'Bless- 
ed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us 
with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ; (verse 4th,) accor- 
ding as he hath chosen us in him, before the foundation of the world, that 
we should be holy, and without biame before him in love; (verse 5th,) hav- 
ing predestinated us, unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to him- 
self, according to the good pleasure of his will; (verse 6th,) to the praise 
of the glory of his grace wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved: 
t verse 7th,) in whom we have redemption thro' his blood, the forgiveness 
•of sins, according to the riches of his grace; (verse 8th,) wherein he hath 
abounded towards us in all wisdom and prudence; (verse 9th,) having made 
known unto us, the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure, 
which he hath purposed in himself.' Again, 2 Thessalonians, ii chap. 13th 
verse: 'But we are bound to give thanks always to God for you brethren, 
beloved of the Lord, because God hath from the beginning chosen you to 
^atvation through sanctification of the spirit, and belief of the truth.' If 
the word beginning, has the game meaning here, as it has where it is men- 
tioned in the first of the gospel of St. John: and if sanctification of the spi* 
Tit, and belief of the truth, mean the same, as holy and without blame be 
fore him in love, then there is a perfect agreement between this passage 
and that which is mentioned above. Holiness i3 not the cause of God's 
election, but God has decreed it to be the way to salvation. ' Without ho- 
liness none shall ever see the Lord.' See Hebrews xii chap. 14th verse. 
Again, 1st Epistle general of Peter, i chap. 2d verse: 'Elect according to 
the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the spirit 
unto obedience.' That angeis were elected, see 1st Timothy, v chap. 2lst 
verse. That the election of men by God is unconditional on the creature's 
part, see Romans, xi chap. 5th verse: 'Even so then at this present time, 
also there is a remnant, according to the election of grace.' Verse 6th: 
*And if by grace, then it is no more of works; otherwise grace is no more 
grace. But if it be of works, then it is no more grace; otherwise work is 
xio more work.' In this election may be included not only all who ever 
did, now do, and hereafter shall believe to the saving of their souls, but 
also all the blessed infants, who die in their infancy, whom Jesus takes up 
in his arms of love, for he said when speaking of infants, St. Luke, xviii 
chap. 16th verse: 'for of such is the kingdom of God.' The scripture doc- 
trine of election will never do any body the least harm, but the abuse of it 
may be hurtful to many. It certainly did not discourage Paul, Acts, xviii 
chap. 9th verse: 'Then spake the Lord to Paul in the night by a vision 
be not afraid, but speak, and hold not thy peace;' verse the 10th: 'for I am 
with thee, and no man shall sit on thee, to hurt thee; for I have much peo- 
ple in this city.* Verse the 11th: 'And he continued there a year and six 
months, teaching the word of God among them.' And Paul said in his2u 
F!pistb to Timothy, ii chap. 10th verse: 'Therefore I endure all thing-; for 



9 

the elect's sake, that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ 
Jesus, with eternal glory. 5 We know that sometimes, God calleth things 
that are not as though they already existed. 

When God spake to Abraham, saying, I have made thee a father of many- 
nations, it was then God's choice that it should be so; which was manifest- 
ed, in the extraordinary circumstance relative to the birth ofylsaac, in whom 
his seed should be called. But with regard to election, you know it takes 
no longer time for you to choose, than to know your choice; though after 
you have made your choice in your own mind, it may be considerable time 
before you make it known to others. And is it not strange, that any per- 
son should believe the Most High does not know his choice a long time be- 
fore he makes it known, or manifest. Our believing that which is reveal-* 
ed in the scriptures concerning this article, doth not oblige us to believe 
any thing which is not written; nor doth it prevent our believing all things 
besides which are contained in the holy scriptures; for all the invitations? 
and promises contained in the gospel may be as fully depended on, as if no- 
thing had heen said concerning election: for we are informed by Isaiah, xl 
chap. 8th verse: 'The word of God shall stand forever.' Nor do we be- 
lieve the Lord will finally reject, any but such as continue disobedient un- 
believers. St. Mark, xvi chap. 16th verse: 'He that believeth not shall bo 
damned.' 

IV. We believe that when God made man at first, he was perfect, holy, and 
upright, able to keep the law, but liable to fall, and that he stood as a federal 
head, or representative of all his natural offspring, and that they were to be par- 
takers of the benefits of his obedience, or exposed to the misery which sprang 
from his disobedience. 

That man was made holy and in the image of God, see Genesis i chap, 
27th verse: 'So God created man, in his own image; in the image of God 
created he him; male and female created he them.' Also, Ecclesiastes, vii 
chap. 29th verse: 'Lo, this only have 1 found, that God made man up- 
right; but they have sought out many inventions.' Also, see Romans vii 
chap. 12th verse: "Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment ho- 
ly, and just, and good.' 

V. We believe that Adam fell from this State of moral rectitude; and that he 
involved himself, and all his natural offspring in a state of death; and for that ori- 
ginal transgression, we are all both filthy and guilty, in the sight of an holy God. 

That man fell from this state of moral rectitude, see Genesis, iii chap. 6th 
verse: 'She took of the fruit thereof and did eat; and gave also unto her 
husband, with her, and he did eat;' verse 7th: 'and the eyes of them both 
were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig 
leaves together, and made themselves aprons." That all mankind are cul- 
pable for this transgression, see Romans, v chap. 12th verse: 'Wherefore 
as by one man sin entered the world, and death by sin; and so death pass- 
ed upon all men, for that all have sinned.' Also, Psalms, xiv chap. 3d 
verse: <They are all gone aside, they are altogether become filthy; there is 
none that doeth good, no, not one.' Also, see Romans, v chap. 17th verse: 
'Therefore, as by the offence of one, judgment came upon all men to con- 
demnation, even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came unto all 
men to justification of life. 3 

VI. We believe it is utterly out of the power of men as fallen creatures, to keep 
the law of God perfectly; repent of their sins truly; or believe in Christ; except 
they be drawn by the Holy Spirit. 

To support this belief, see Romans, viii chap. 7ih verse: 'Because the 
carnal mind is enmity against God; for it is not subject to the law of God, 



10 

neither indeed can it be.' Verse 8th: 'So then they that are in the flesu 
cannot please God.' Also, see St. John, vi chap. 44th verse: 'No man can 
come to me, except the Father, which hath sent me, draw him.' Also, 
see Acts, v chap. 3 1st verse: 'Him hath God exalted with his right hand, 
to be a Prince and a Saviour for to give repentance to Israel, and forgive- 
ness of sins.' Also, see 1st Corinthians, xii chap. 3d verse: *No man can 
say that Jesus is the Lord, but by the Holy Ghost.' 

VII. We believe that in God's own appointed times and way, (by means whieh 
he has ordained,) the elect shall be called, justified, pardoned, and sanctified; and 
that it is impossible they can, utterly refuse the call, but shall be made willing, by 
divine grace, to receive the offers of mercy. 

In support of this article, we offer the following scriptures, viz: see St. 
John, v chap. 25th verse: 'Verily, verily, I say unto you, the hour is com- 
ing, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God, and 
they that hear shall live.' Also, see Romans, viii chap. 30th verse: 
'Moreover, whom he did predestinate, them he also called; and whom he 
called, them he also justified ; and whom he justified, them he also glori- 
fied.' Verse 33d: 'Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God's elect? 
it is God that justifieth.' Also, see Psalms, ex. and 3d verse: 'Thy people 
shall be willing in the day of thy power.' Also, see Philippians, ii chap. 
13lh verse: 'For it is God, which worketh in you both to will, and to do, 
of his good pleasure.' 

VIII. We believe that justification in the sight of God, is only by the imputexl 
righteousness of Jesus Christ, received, and applied by faith alone. 

To support this article, we quote Romans, iii chap. 20th verse: 'There- 
fore, by the deeds,of the law, there shall no flesh be justified in his sight ^ 
for by the law is the knowledge of sin.' V°rse 21st:. 'But now the righ- 
teousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the 
law and the prophets;' verse 22d: 'even the righteousness of God, which is 
by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe; for there 
is no difference.' Also, see Romans, iv chap. 7th verse: 'Blessed are they 
whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered.' Verse 8th; 
'Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.' Also, see 
Jeremiah, xx iii chap. Gth verse: 'In his days, Judah shall be saved, and Is- 
rael shall dwell safely; and this is his name whereby he shall be called, 
The Lord our Righteousness.' Also, see Romans, v chap. 19th verse: 
'For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obe- 
dience of one, shall many be made righteous.' Also, see Psalms, Ixxxix 
and 16th verse: 'In thy name shall they rejoice all the day; and in thy 
righteousness shall they be exalted.' 

IX. We believe, in like manner, that God's elect, shall not only be called and 
justified, but that they shall be converted, born again, and changed by the effectu- 
al working of God's holy spirit. 

In support of this article we refer to the following scriptures, viz: 2d 
Corinthians, v chnp. 17th verse: 'Therefore, if any man be in Christ, he is 
a new creature; old things are passed away, behold all things are become 
new.' Also, see St. John, i chap. 13th verse: 'Which were born, not of 
blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.' Al- 
so, 1st Peter, i chap. 23d verse: 'Being born again, not of corruptible seed, 
but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth forev- 
er.' Also, see 2d Corinthians, iii chap. 18th verse: 'But we all, with open 
face beholding as in a glass, the glory of the Lord, are changed into the 
same image from glory to glory, even by the spirit of the Lord.' Also, 



11 

see Ephesians, i chap. 19th verse: <And what is the exceeding greatness of 
Iiis power to us- ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty 
power.' Also, 1st Thessalonians, i chap. 1 St h verse: 'For this cause also 
thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God 
which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but, (as it is 
in truth) the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that be- 
lieve. 

X. We believe, that such as are converted, justified, and called by grace, shall 
persevere in holiness, and never fall finally away. 

For satisfaction on this article we refer you to Hebrews, vii chap. 25lh 
verse: 'Wherefore, he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come 
unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.' 

XI. We believe it to be a duty incumbent on all God's people, to walk righ- 
teously in good works, (not in the old covenant way of seeking life and the favor 
of the Lord by it,) but only as a duty from a principle of love. 

We refer you to Titus, iii chap. 8th verse: 'This is a faithful saying, and 
these things I will that thou affirm constantly, that they that have believed 
in God might be careful to maintain good works: these things are good 
and profitable unto men.' Also see 1st Epistle of John, v chap. 3d verse: 
'For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments; and his com- 
mandments are not grievous.' Also, see Ephesians, ii chap. 10th verse: 
'For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, 
which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.' 

XII. We believe, baptism and the Lord's Supper are gospel ordinances, both 
belonging to the converted, or true believer; and that persons who were sprinkled 
or dipt whilst in unbelief, were not regularly baptized according to God's word; 
and that such ought to be baptized after they are savingly converted into the faith 
of Christ. \ - 

*The most of the people among whom we live, agree with us, 1st, that 
baptism and the Lord's Supper are gospel ordinances; 2dly, that believers 
are proper subjects of these ordinances; 3dly, that believers may be pro- 
perly baptized by immersion. Now if the scriptures be so plain concern- 
ing these things that they cannot well be denied, why should we take up 
time to prove them? and such as practice differently in these things from 
what we do, it lies on them to prove they are right, (if they can;) if they 
cannot, it is time for them to desist, or at least, not to find fault with Us 
for keeping the ordinances as they were delivered. 

XIII. We believe that every church is independent in matters of dicipline; and 
that Associations, Councils, and Conferences, of several ministers, or churches, 
are not to impose ou the churches, the keeping, holding, or maintaining, any prin- 
ciple or practice, contrary to the churches judgment. 

For thus believing we rely on these scripteres, viz: Isaiah, xxxiii chap. 
22d verse: 'For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord 
is our king; he will save us.' Also, see James, iv chap. 12th verse: 'The 
Lord is our lawgiver, who is able to save and to destroy.' Also, see 1st 
Peter, v chap. 3d verse: 'Neither as being lords over God's heritage, but 
being insamples to the flock.' Thus it appears, that the Lord only, has a 
right to give laws to his church; therefore they ought to be guided by his 
word, in all matters of discipline. 

XIV. We believe, in the resurrection of the dead, both of the just and the un- 
just, and a general judgment. 

We believe this from the following scriptures, viz: St. John, v chap. 
33th and 29th verses: 'Marvel not at this, for the hour is coming, in which 
sll that are in their graves shall hear his voice; and shall come forth, they 



IS 

that have done good unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done 
evil, unto the resurrection of damnation/ Also, see 2d Corinthians, v 
chap. 10th verse: 'For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, 
that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that 
he hath done, whether it be good or bad.* 

XV. We believe, the punishment of the wicked is everlasting, and the joys of 
the righteous are eternal. 

Christ said, in St. Matthew's gospel, xxv chap. 46th verse: 'And these 
shall go away into everlasting punishment, but the righteous into life eternal.' 

XVI. We believe, that no minister has aright to the administration of the ordi- 
nances only such as are regularly called, and come under imposition of hands by 
the presbytery. 

We feel under obligation to believe so when we read in the Acts of the 
Apostles, xiii chap. 2d and 3d verses: 'As they ministered unto the Lord 
snd fasted, the Holy Ghost said, separate me Barnabas and Saul, for the 
work whereunto I have called them; and when they had fasted, and pray- 
ed, and laid their hands on them, they sent them away.' 

XVII. Last we do believe, that for the mutual comfort, union, satisfaction of 
the several churches of the aforesaid faith and order, that they ought to meet in 
an Association way, wherein each church ought to represent their case, by their 
delegates, and attend as often as it is necessary to advise with the several chur- 
ches in conference; and that the decision of matters, in such Association, not to be 
imposed, or in any wise binding on the churches without their consent. But only 
to set and act as an advisory council. 

Solomon says, Proverbs, xi chan. 14th verse: 'Where no council is, the 
people fall; but in the multitude of councilors there is safety.' And we 
find the apostles assembled on certain occasions to confer about the affairs 
of the churches. See Acts, xv chap. 6th verse: 'And the apostles and el- 
ders came together for to consider of this matter.' If Paul, Barnabas, and 
others, therefore were delegated by their brethren of the churches at Anti- 
och to assemble, or associate, with the apostles at Jerusalem, how much 
more will the propriety, and necessity of such meetings, or assemblies, ap- 
pear to us, who do not enjoy their abilities, or possess their powers. A 
great number of scriptures more, might be deduced to show, that our prin- 
ciples are scriptural; but such as believe not these, which we have subjoin- 
ed, we are persuaded would not believe, though another were to arise from 
the dead. 

It would be well for the brethren and churches generally, to bear in 
mind, that these are the principles, or articles of faith, that our Association 
was established on, and every church that has been since received in her, ta- 
citly subscribed to on their reception; that if any of them since, 'have got 
wise above that which is written,' it is high time for them to retreat, or 
withdraw from the camps of Israel, and let it be seen, 'who is on the Lord's 
side,' and no longer intrude themselves upon Zion's soldiers — and let our 
ranks be clear of tories. 

Now unto Him that is able to do exceedingly above all that we can ask, 
or think, unto Him be glory given in all the churches of Christ Jesus, in 
this time, and throughout all ages, world without end.